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NPR Story
12:15 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend

Music Interviews
12:03 pm
Sat September 22, 2012

Elliott Sharp: 'Blues Is A Feeling'

"Blues is a feeling, and it exists cross-culturally. It always has existed, and it always will. It's part of being human," says musician Elliott Sharp.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 3:36 pm

In the 1980s, Elliott Sharp was the height of New York City cool, a central part of that town's experimental music scene. His creations were inspired by advanced mathematical concepts. He tuned his guitars according to the Fibonacci Sequence and wrote challenging pieces inspired by fractal geometry.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:49 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Limericks

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Not So Killer, a Veggie Tall Tale, and Mickey Mouse Clubbin'.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
11:49 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Panel Round Two

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing this week with Mo Rocca, Faith Salie and Roy Blount, Jr. And here again is your host, at the Fox Theater in Atlanta, Georgia, Peter Sagal.

(APPLAUSE)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl. In just a minute, Carl says, "frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a rhyme," in our Listener Limerick Challenge. If you'd like to play, give us a call at 1-888-Wait-Wait, that's 1-888-924-8924.

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Simon Says
10:35 am
Sat September 22, 2012

The Emoticon Turns 30, Seems Happy About It :-)

The emoticon turns 30 this week.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 11:33 am

The emoticon, punctuation to depict a facial expression, began 30 years ago this week. Using three keystrokes, the colon, dash and parenthesis, to suggest a smile may not be a great scientific advance, like the coronary stent or computer chip. But the emoticon has been simple, useful and enduring.

There had been previous hints of emoticons. A newspaper transcript of Abraham Lincoln drawing a laugh in 1862 follows it with a semi-colon and parentheses, but that may have simply been a printer's typo.

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