Alejandra Martinez

Alejandra Martinez is the associate producer for WLRN&rsquo's Sundial. Her love for radio started at her mother’s beauty shop where she noticed that stories are all around her - important stories to tell.

When she took her first audio storytelling class in college, she was sold to the world of public radio journalism. She feels that audio blocks out the world and creates a single intimate connection.

This native Texan began her radio career interning for Latino USA in New York City where she reported stories on Texas politics, immigration, culture and arts. She then worked with KUT Austin’s NPR station as an intern and later a producer where she produced stories, worked on social media content and special projects, including launching the KUT Book Club. She participated in NPR’s Next-Generation Radio project, a week-long digital and radio journalism boot camp, where she covered Houston’s recovery post-Hurricane Harvey.

Ale graduated from The University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism in December 2017 and moved to Miami shortly after. She considers herself a coffee fanatic, a bookworm and the queen of digital. When she moved to South Florida and noticed all the Instagram-able spots around town she fell in love. She was amazed by the huge Latino population and rich culture of the region and has a true desire to share the stories of what make South Florida so great.

Connect with Alejandra on Twitter: @_martinez_ale and send her pitches at amartinez@wlrnnews.org

Two organizations have teamed up to save the Florida Bonneted Bat, one of the rarest and most endangered bats in the world.

Miami Art Week is over but one exhibit is sticking around: "The Art of Banksy" offers a 20-year snapshot of the world-renowned graffiti artist's best art pieces.

Banksy’s identity remains anonymous, but in October the artist shocked art aficionados when someone bought his “Girl With Balloon” for $1.4 million at Sotheby’s Auction House in London and then, upon purchase, the painting destroyed itself with a shredder built into the frame.

Events like Art Basel and Spring Break bring tens of thousands of spectators, art aficionados and tourists to Miami, but creates logistical challenges for residents.

Miami Beach Police Chief Daniel Oates says the "real solution" to improve the safety and traffic nightmare is a "robust" security plan and more cops on the ground.  

Oates joined Sundial to talk about his department's efforts.

This conversation has been edited lightly for clarity. 

The race for Florida Agricultural Commissioner is currently undergoing a manual recount.

Last Tuesday, Republican state Rep. Matt Caldwell was deemed the winner and claimed victory at an election watch party in North Fort Myers. But the vote differential between Caldwell and Democrat Nicole “Nikki” Fried was so small, at just 0.16 percent, that the race went to an automatic recount.

A South Florida environmental technology company has a plan to fight the state's blue-green algae problems with microscopic plastic beads. 

Green Water Solution is one of four finalists for the George Barley Water Prize, a $10 million award started by the Everglades Foundation to address toxic algae blooms through new technologies. The prize is intended to fund a technology that can be used around the globe to reduce phosphorus contamination in water.

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