Amy Tardif

FM Station Manager & News Director

Amy Tardif is WGCU’s FM Station Manager and News Director. She oversees a staff of 6 in news, production and the radio reading service.  Her program Lucia's Letter on human trafficking received a coveted Peabody Award, an Edward R. Murrow Award, a gold medal from the New York Festivals and 1st place for Best Documentary from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. She was the producer and host of Gulf Coast Live Arts Edition for 8 years and spent 14 years as WGCU’s local host of NPR's Morning Edition. Amy spent five years as producer and managing editor of WGCU-TV’s former monthly environmental documentary programs In Focus on the Environment and Earth Edition. She is the first woman in radio to Chair RTDNA, having previously served as Chair-Elect and the Region 13 representative on its Board of Directors for which she helped write an e-book on plagiarism and fabrication. She also serves on the FPBS Board of Directors and served on the PRNDI Board of Directors from 2007 -2012. And she served on the Editorial Integrity for Public Media Project helping to write the section on employee's activities beyond their public media work. Prior to joining WGCU Public Media in 1993, she was the spokesperson for the Fort Myers Police Department, spent 6 years reporting and anchoring for television stations in Fort Myers and Austin, Minnesota and reported for WUSF Public Radio in Tampa.  Amy also loves spending time with her two teenaged sons, performing in local theater and horseback riding.

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Ways To Connect

For Memorial Day we meet two women who made the military their lives. Captain Nori Ann Reed of Sanibel was the first woman assigned onboard Navy ships, and later was the first woman to have the honor of being Captain of three Navy ships. She commanded Naval Logistics Command, US naval Forces, Central Command operating ships and aircraft over 2.5 million square miles of water, including the Arabian Gulf, Indian Ocean and Red Sea in support of US military forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Captain Reed went to Cypress Lake High School in Fort Myers, FAU in Boca Raton and entered the Navy through Officer Candidate School. She’s now back on Sanibel.

820 Floridians could die from melanoma this year. It’s the most lethal form of skin cancer. A recent study cited by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says 6000 cases of melanoma are estimated to be related to indoor tanning in the U.S. each year. May is melanoma month. This story looks at one group of people who is seeing a dramatic rise in the number of these cases. They’re young women and teens. And they’re the same group also going to tanning salons more often.

This month’s Versed in Florida is with poet Sidney Wade. She teaches English at the University of Florida. Her poems and translations of foreign language poems have appeared in a wide variety of journals, including Poetry, The New Yorker, and The Paris Review. WADE's Turkish poetry translations will be published in October. She tells WGCU’s Amy Tardif she’s turned to birding, landscaping and the environment and that’s what this month’s poem is about.

Amy Tardif

A special committee of The Florida Gulf Coast University Board of Trustees decided not to remove any active degree programs from the university catalog Wednesday. Trustees will leave such decisions in the hands of administrators.

Sara Comito – Listing

Apr 28, 2015

This month’s Versed in Florida is with Sara Comito. She graduated with an English degree from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and has been living in Fort Myers for the past 13 years. Comito works as communications editor for a local PR and Marketing agency. Her poetry has appeared in dozens of print and electronic journals and anthologies. Undeterred by the small size of their square city lot, she and her stonemason husband are urban farmers and beekeepers which, she tells WGCU’s Amy Tardif, is a muse for her poetry.

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