Amy Tardif

FM Station Manager & News Director

Amy Tardif is WGCU’s FM Station Manager and News Director. She oversees a staff of 10 full and part-time people and interns in news, production and the radio reading service.  Her program Lucia's Letter on human trafficking received a coveted Peabody Award, an Edward R. Murrow Award, a gold medal from the New York Festivals and 1st place for Best Documentary from the Public Radio News Directors Inc. She was the first woman in radio to Chair RTDNA, having previously served as Chair-Elect and the Region 13 representative on its Board of Directors for which she helped write an e-book on plagiarism and fabrication. She also serves on the FPBS Board of Directors and served on the PRNDI Board of Directors from 2007 -2012.  Tardif has been selected twice to serve as a managing editor for NPR's Next Generation Radio Project.  She served on the Editorial Integrity for Public Media Project helping to write the section on employee's activities beyond their public media work. She was the producer and host of Gulf Coast Live Arts Edition for 8 years and spent 14 years as WGCU’s local host of NPR's Morning Edition. Amy spent five years as producer and managing editor of WGCU-TV’s former monthly environmental documentary programs In Focus on the Environment and Earth Edition. Prior to joining WGCU Public Media in 1993, she was the spokesperson for the Fort Myers Police Department, spent 6 years reporting and anchoring for television stations in Fort Myers and Austin, Minnesota and reported for WUSF Public Radio in Tampa.  Amy has two sons in college and loves fencing, performing in local theater and horseback riding.

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Ways to Connect

Photo: Pixabay via Public Domain

The first offshore sale in the US Oil and Gas Leasing program for the year has concluded. It offered the largest amount of acreage in the history of the federal offshore program in the Gulf of Mexico. Meanwhile the Trump Administration is working to expand offshore drilling into the eastern Gulf and other new areas. 

A Million Fragile Bones

Aug 22, 2017

Florida native, Connie May Fowler, is a prolific writer with six novels and two memoirs to her name. Oprah Winfrey adapted her book “Before Women Had Wings,” winner of the 1996 Southern Book Critics Circle Award, into a film. Fowler teaches in the MFA program at Vermont College of Fine Arts and also lives in Mexico where she founded the Yucatan Writing Conference. Sally Bissell reviews her latest release.

Stephanie Davis

After the weekend’s violent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia the Lee County NAACP once again calls for Confederate symbols to be removed from Lee County. There’s a Robert E. Lee statue on Monroe Street in Fort Myers and a portrait of the Confederate General hanging in the Lee County commission chambers. The removal of a statue of Lee from a park in Charlottesville led to the white supremacist rally.

PHOTO: NATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Florida Department of Health in Lee County says there’s been a spike in confirmed cases of infectious syphilis in the county. They’re calling the increase alarming.

65-year-old Jim McCracken talks with his wife 60-year-old Karen Feldman about the death of his brother David McCracken from AIDS in 1992 at the age of 36. He remembers David's bright spirit and their complicated relationship in this week’s StoryCorps of southwest Florida.

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