Caitlin Switalski

Caitie Switalski is a rising senior at the University of Florida. She's worked for WFSU-FM in Tallahassee as an intern and reporter. When she's in Gainesville for school, Caitie is an anchor and producer for local Morning Edition content at WUFT-FM, as well as a digital editor for the station's website. 
 
Her favorite stories are politically driven, about how politicians, laws and policies effect local communities. 
 
Once she graduates with a dual degree in Journalism and English, Caitie hopes to make a career continuing to report and produce for NPR stations in the sunshine state. 
 
When she's not following what's happening with changing laws, you can catch Caitie lounging in local coffee shops, at the beach, or watching Love Actually for the hundredth time. 
 

Just as the company says it’s hardening the power grid against future hurricanes, Florida Power & Light is also making some of its service centers more resilient against storm damages. 

South Florida filmmaker Gina Onori has paired up with students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to make a film about their anti-gun violence movement following February’s mass shooting. 

The film, called WE ARE THE CHANGE, follows Stoneman Douglas students before, during, and after the March For Our Lives rally in Washington D.C. two months ago. It even captures the students in legislative meetings.

Broward County’s 911 system was widely criticized after communication failures during the 2017 airport shooting in Fort Lauderdale. Now it's under scrutiny again for similar failures during the Parkland shooting. 

Files show that critical upgrades have been recommended on the system since at least 2016; most were never made.

There was no excitement or celebration when Lori Alhadeff and Ryan Petty filed their candidacy papers Tuesday morning to run for Broward County School Board. 

Instead, the parents were somber as they spoke of their sense of duty to make schools safer nearly three months after a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School left their children dead. Fifteen others were also killed in the shooting Feb. 14. 

Hurricane season is fast approaching, which means summer is nearly here, as well. For South Florida, this signals increased attention on storm forecasts and applying lessons learned when it comes to evacuation and emergency plans, storm shutters and the possibility of losing power during the most sweltering time of the year.

Last year, more than 700,000 homes had their power knocked out as Hurricane Irma arrived in South Florida. It hit the lower Keys as a Category 4 storm but slowed down to a Cat. 1 as it made its way up the Florida peninsula. 

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