Christine DiMattei

Years ago, after racking her brains trying to find a fun, engaging, creative nighttime gig to subsidize her acting habit, Chris decided to ride her commercial voiceover experience into the fast-paced world of radio broadcasting. She started out with traffic reporting, moved on to news . . . and never looked back. Since then, Chris has worked in newsrooms throughout South Florida, producing stories for radio broadcasts and the web.

In her other life, she has been married to 12 husbands (including a not-so-wild boar and a garden slug), given birth to 15 children, died four times, twice taken vows as a nun and once been abducted by pirates in the Caribbean. And all this by doing English language dubbing for dozens of foreign films, soap operas and cartoons. 
 
Both lives, she says, have been "a most excellent adventure."

School resource officers and police departments throughout South Florida have a message for any student who thinks it might be a funny prank to call in a threat to a school: it’s a serious crime with grave consequences. And they’re cracking down.

A Palm Beach Post investigation has uncovered Florida's role in igniting the country’s heroin epidemic in 2011.

 

The state’s repeated failure to control its own prescription drug problem would eventually lead to more addicts turning to heroin not only on Florida, but in other states around the country. 

Among the bills that Gov. Rick Scott signed into law this year is one called the “Sunshine Protection Act.”

It basically puts an end to the bi-annual “spring forward and fall back” changing of the clocks and keeps Florida on Daylight Saving Time for the entire year.

 

 

One of Miami’s most popular music festivals is back.

The Ultra Music Festival is expected to draw tens of thousands of people Friday through Sunday to Bayfront Park in downtown Miami, an area surrounded by high-rise buildings.

 

In the aftermath of any major storm, we can expect to see many toppled and uprooted trees in South Florida. But recently one massive tree in a public park in Miami-Dade was tagged with a heartfelt plea for passersby.

Stuck on the tree were two handwritten signs reading “I’m alive. So stand me up!”

“It's a good intention,” says Adrian Hunsberger, urban horticulture agent with the University of Florida/Miami-Dade County Extension Office. “But usually if it's blown over and it's laying on its side it's really beyond salvaging.”

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