Christine DiMattei

Years ago, after racking her brains trying to find a fun, engaging, creative nighttime gig to subsidize her acting habit, Chris decided to ride her commercial voiceover experience into the fast-paced world of radio broadcasting. She started out with traffic reporting, moved on to news . . . and never looked back. Since then, Chris has worked in newsrooms throughout South Florida, producing stories for radio broadcasts and the web.

In her other life, she has been married to 12 husbands (including a not-so-wild boar and a garden slug), given birth to 15 children, died four times, twice taken vows as a nun and once been abducted by pirates in the Caribbean. And all this by doing English language dubbing for dozens of foreign films, soap operas and cartoons. 
 
Both lives, she says, have been "a most excellent adventure."

It’s banned in Europe.

Puerto Ricans took to the streets to keep it off their island.

But a controversial pesticide is being aerial-sprayed over a Miami-Dade Zika hot zone in a race to kill the virus-carrying aedes aegypti mosquito. And its use is raising concerns about possible health risks posed by long-term exposure to the chemical.

Below, Miami Herald reporter Andres Viglucci answers some questions about the pesticide called Naled.

What is Naled?

How would you like to pack up the cooler and head to your favorite Florida beach -- only to find the ocean water covered with foul-smelling, guacamole-thick fluorescent green gunk?  

That's what many Treasure Coast year-round residents and tourists are dealing with.  The blue-green algae spread is so bad that Gov. Rick Scott last week declared a state of emergency in four Florida counties -- including Palm Beach County.  

New cases of the virus that causes AIDS are becoming less frequent throughout the United States.

But not in Florida.

Statewide, HIV infections have been increasing in recent years, with Miami-Dade and Broward counties topping the list. But a new law might help stem the tide of those new cases. For the first time, Florida has a needle-exchange program for intravenous drug users.

On Jan. 12, 2010, former Associated Press reporter Jonathan Katz was the only full-time American correspondent in Haiti when the earthquake hit. The massive quake left hundreds of thousands of people dead and more than a million homeless.

In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, foreign aid was pledged from all corners of the world. But six years after the devastating earthquake --  in spite of the combined efforts of international aid organizations, foreign governments and Haiti's own leaders – Haiti is still struggling to rebuild.

Jan. 12, 2016 turned out to be Cary Lambrix’s lucky day.

It was on that day the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Florida's death sentencing process was unconstitutional because it gives judges rather than juries the power to condemn someone to death. As a result, Lambrix, who’s been on Death Row for 31 years for murdering two people in Glades County, had his Feb. 11, 2016 execution blocked by the Florida Supreme court.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling now has Florida lawmakers racing to fix the state's way of dispensing capital punishment.

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