Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

Florida’s embattled medical marijuana office continues wading through rulemaking—two years after Florida voters approved the system. But the industry is moving faster than regulators ability to govern it, leading to problems.

The Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce continues examining whether consolidating city and county services would be a good fit for the area. But it’s efforts have drawn pushback from some local officials—city mayor Andrew Gillum and county commissioner Bill Proctor most notably. But what’s the big deal?

Teachers in several states have gone on strike in recent months, protesting for better pay and working conditions. But that’s not the case in Florida, and likely will never be. Still, once upon a time, Florida led the first teacher strike in the United States. 

The Florida Supreme Court will take up a long running lawsuit over public school funding. The lawsuit began in 2009 and has made its way through the courts, spanned two governors, multiple education commissioners, and three house and senate leaders.

Florida voters will be asked in November whether to automatically restore voting rights to felons who have completed their sentences. This comes as the state clemency board has been ordered to revise its process for restoring rights. Now some state candidates are weighing in.

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