Lynn Hatter

Lynn Hatter is a  Florida A&M University graduate with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Lynn has served as reporter/producer for WFSU since 2007 with education and health care issues as her key coverage areas.  She is an award-winning member of the Capital Press Corps and has participated in the NPR Kaiser Health News Reporting Partnership and NPR Education Initiative.  When she’s not working, Lynn spends her time watching sci-fi and action movies, writing her own books, going on long walks through the woods, traveling and exploring antique stores. Follow Lynn Hatter on Twitter: @HatterLynn.

Phone: (850) 487-3086

President Donald Trump is threatening to put tariffs on steel and aluminum imported into the United States, and Friday the European Union released a list of products it says it will tax in retaliation—including Orange Juice.

It was a disappointing legislative session for Florida A&M University. The school lost out on its top building priorities, but lawmakers did give it a few million more in operational funds.

The National Rifle Association is suing the state over newly approved gun restrictions that mandate a three-day waiting period for gun purchases and raise the buying age from 18 to 21 for most people. At least one GOP congressman and state gubernatorial hopeful thinks it was the wrong move.

Florida lawmakers have approved a massive education measure that could whittle down the power of teachers unions, allow bullied students to transfer to private or other private schools, and expands the state’s corporate tax scholarship program. Lynn Hatter spoke with Tom Flanigan about the measures path toward approval, and how it fits in the puzzle that is making a budget.

There have been nearly 100 threats leveled against schools in the wake of the Valentine's Day shooting at a South Florida High School. Many of those who issued the threats are teens and students themselves. Some have claimed they were just, "joking." Law enforcement officials say they take all threats seriously and many student have been arrested for them, some, are facing felony charges. But whether those charges will stick is another matter, and state prosecutors say there's no law on the books that bans threats against schools. The ones that are in place for general threats of violence, are in need of updates. Second Judicial Circuit State Attorney Jack Campbell says it comes down one question: Was the threat implicit, or explicit?

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