Matthew F Smith

Gulf Coast Live Producer

Matthew Smith is a reporter and producer of WGCU’s Gulf Coast Live.

Originally from Delaware, he moved to Alaska in 2010 for his first job in radio. He spent five years working as a radio and television reporter, as well as a radio producer, talk show host, and news director at stations across Alaska, where his reporting received awards from the Alaska Press Club and the Alaska Broadcasters Association. Relocating to southwest Florida, he spent several months producing television news before joining WGCU as the Gulf Coast Live producer in August 2016.

Matthew studied English and journalism at Villanova University in Villanova, PA, where he wrote for the school newspaper and other school publications. He taught English as a Second Language for several years in China and the U.S. before pursuing a career in journalism.

Photo: Wikimedia Creative Commons

With three reported alligator bites in as many days in Southwest Florida, and state wildlife officials reporting a record pace of 16 such bites so far in 2017, we turn to the people who work with them every day for some tips on alligator behavior and how to avoid a bite.

Photo: Miami-Dade Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

A man arrested in Miami-Dade county in March was cleared for release but held an extra day at the request of federal immigration officials, an act he alleges in a lawsuit violated his fourth amendment rights. Garland Creedle is now suing the county with the help of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Photo: Wikimedia Creative Commons

The British newspaper “The Guardian” last month revealed a piece of property in the middle of Florida that happened to be owned by none other the President Donald Trump. He bought it in 2005 for one dollar from a woman who’d bought it a month prior for more than $3,000.

Photo: David Albers, Naples Daily News

On Friday, the man accused of killing his wife and five young children in Collier County in 2009 will be in a court trying to prove he can represent himself at his murder trial. It's what Mesac Damas has been asking for since his arrest shortly after the murders, when police tracked him down in Haiti.

Photo: Renata Sago, WMFE

Florida sends more juveniles to adult court than any other state. Teens tried and convicted in Florida courts face longer sentences than adults found guilty of the same crime. At the same time, a juvenile tried as adult in Florida is less likely to face jail time than their peers tried in juvenile court. Those are just some of the findings of a new FSU study looking at how Florida treats juveniles transferred to its adult courts.

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