Matthew F Smith

Gulf Coast Live Producer

Matthew Smith is a reporter and producer of WGCU’s Gulf Coast Live.

Originally from Delaware, he moved to Alaska in 2010 for his first job in radio. He spent five years working as a radio and television reporter, as well as a radio producer, talk show host, and news director at stations across Alaska, where his reporting received awards from the Alaska Press Club and the Alaska Broadcasters Association. Relocating to southwest Florida, he spent several months producing television news before joining WGCU as the Gulf Coast Live producer in August 2016.

Matthew studied English and journalism at Villanova University in Villanova, PA, where he wrote for the school newspaper and other school publications. He taught English as a Second Language for several years in China and the U.S. before pursuing a career in journalism.

Farmworker's Association of Florida

Florida farmers face acute needs for labor when the harvest comes, and in recent years they've relied on guest workers from other countries under the H-2A visa program to pick their crops. The visa locks the guest worker into a contract with their employer, who has to meet an array of obligations to those workers as they live and work in the U.S. Some see it as a model program, while others call it a program of last resort.

Photo: Farmworker's Association of Florida

Undocumented workers in Florida who are hurt on the job are not only being denied workers' comp coverage, they’re being charged with insurance fraud, held in jail, and then deported.

Photo: Forest Wander via Flicker Creative Commons / https://www.flickr.com/photos/forestwander-nature-pictures/7224224332

Fundraising effort are underway for the humble honey bee, as the University of Florida’s Honey Bee Research and Extension Laboratory reaches toward just shy of its $3.5 million goal to build a state-of the-art facility for scholars and Florida beekeepers to study the behavior, husbandry, ecology, biodiversity, and conservation of the honey bee.

health.mil

While the temptation is great, don’t stare at Monday’s solar eclipse without the right eye protection.  That’s according to Dr. Alexandra Konowal who joins Gulf Coast Live today.  We’ll ask exactly what makes a solar eclipse so dangerous for eyes and learn how our understanding of its effects has grown since the last total solar blackout- 38 years ago.

Photo: Pixabay via Public Domain

A saliva swab collected from a patient’s cheek can tell doctors what kinds of drugs will work best for a patient. It's the promise of pharmacogenomics, the science behind matching a patient's genetic profile with right medicine—and avoiding drugs that could actually harm them.

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