Nadege Green

Nadege Green loves only-in-Miami stories. After five years as a Miami Herald reporter, she is convinced Miami is the best news town ever. Really, you can’t make up some of the stuff that happens here.

Nadege has covered local city governments and as a sub-beat, Miami’s Haitian community.

She is a graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Former Palm Beach Gardens Officer Nouman Raja tried to use Florida's "stand your ground" law to have manslaughter and attempted murder charges against him dismissed. Raja shot and killed  Corey Jones, 31, whose car was stranded on the side of the road.

On Friday, Circuit Judge Samantha Schosberg Feuer denied the motion to dismiss.

A Spanish language play in Miami that's been showing since January until recently featured a character in blackface.

The promotional video for "Tres Viudas en un Crucero" (Three Widows on a Cuise) shows a fair-skinned actress smeared in brown makeup and overdrawn big red lips pounding her chest and joking about having fun like three gorillas.

Florida was the first state to enact a "stand your ground" law. Under the law, a person is allowed to use lethal force — and has no duty to retreat — if they believe they are in danger.

Since it was enacted in 2005, the law has drawn high-profile controversies, including the shooting of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

Harvard professor Caroline Light was recently in Miami to talk about the law’s historical roots and her book “Stand Your Ground: A History of America's Love Affair with Lethal Self-Defense.”

President Donald Trump visited South Florida Monday and heard Cuban-American business owners heap praise on him for his $1.5 trillion tax cut package.

At Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School’s Black History Month Show, a student walked out on stage to read a one-page statement defending the Black Lives Matter movement.

This part of the show was not rehearsed ahead of time, it was a last-minute decision by some of the black student organizers to respond to a letter that ran in the school’s paper. 

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