Nadege Green

Nadege Green loves only-in-Miami stories. After five years as a Miami Herald reporter, she is convinced Miami is the best news town ever. Really, you can’t make up some of the stuff that happens here.

Nadege has covered local city governments and as a sub-beat, Miami’s Haitian community.

She is a graduate of Barry University where she majored in English with the hope of someday becoming the next great novelist — she’s still working on that dream.

Gender equality is one of the issues at the forefront of the national conversation right now, and that’s what an art show at Brickell City Centre is exploring as part of Miami Art Week.

The show is called  “Fair.”

Days after Hurricane Irma battered South Florida, Rufus James walked through his Liberty City neighborhood in Miami looking for paid work to chop down trees and clean up yards.

Like many Floridians, James, 57, was going on day four with no electricity. At home, he had three grandchildren to feed. They’re eating “cornflakes and whatever we can come up with. I’m looking for some food,” he said.

Before the storm, James said he worked odd jobs — helping elderly neighbors mow their lawns or move heavy items. Post storm, no one was paying for help yet.

Women in Miami-Dade earn 87 cents for every dollar a man makes. One in five women in Miami-Dade lives in poverty.

The Women's Fund of Miami-Dade wants to change that. 

The 25-year old nonprofit with a specific focus on improving the lives of girls and women is shifting its focus to create structural change when it comes to pay equity. 

In the past, the fund provided substantial grants to a wide range of community groups. Some provided housing support, children services or assistance to domestic violence victims.

Heidy Rodriguez, 17, created an LGBTQ support group at her Miami-Dade high school when she realized that like her, many of her friends needed a place to share their struggles and successes.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida is suing Miami-Dade County and Mayor Carlos Giménez for complying with a federal request to detain inmates who are in the country illegally.

The lawsuit is seeking to overturn the county's new policy after an 18-year-old U.S. citizen — who cannot be deported — was detained.

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