Rachel Iacovone

Gulf Coast Live Associate Producer, Reporter

Rachel Iacovone is a reporter and associate producer of Gulf Coast Live for WGCU News. Rachel came to WGCU as an intern in 2016, during the presidential race. She went on to cover Florida Gulf Coast University students at President Donald Trump's inauguration on Capitol Hill and Southwest Floridians in attendance at the following day's Women's March on Washington.

Rachel was first contacted by WGCU when she was managing editor of FGCU's student-run media group, Eagle News. She helped take Eagle News from a weekly newspaper to a daily online publication with TV and radio branches within two years, winning the 2016 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award for Best Use of Multimedia in a cross-platform series she led for National Coming Out Day. She also won the Mark of Excellence Award for Feature Writing for her five-month coverage of an FGCU student's transition from male to female.

As a WGCU reporter, she produced the first radio story in WGCU's Curious Gulf Coast project, which answered the question: Does SWFL Have More Cases of Pediatric Cancer?

During Hurricane Irma, Rachel was live on air as the sun shone through the eye of the storm, as it passed over the Collier County Emergency Operations Center where she was stationed.

Rachel graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a bachelor's degree in journalism.

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced a record number of green sea turtle nests documented this year. With about 39,000 green sea turtle nests logged along 800 miles of beaches, the organization calls the turtles’ success a victory for conservation.

www.flfirstdetector.org

Florida has the most invasive species of any state in the country, and half of the insects, reptiles, arachnids and crustaceans imported into the United States come through Florida ports, that’s according to researchers at the University of Florida. So, in an effort to identify invasive insects before they become prolific, UF/IFAS has created the Florida First Detectors program. The idea is to train stakeholders like Florida Master Gardeners, nursery managers, and farmers to identify invasive pests. We’re joined by Dr. Amanda Hodges, a UF/IFAS Extension scientist and co-author of a new invasive insects identification guide to learn more about the program and how people can get involved. We're also joined by Ian Bartoszek, Wildlife Biologist/Science Coordinator with the Conservancy of Southwest Florida to talk about his work with invasive reptiles like Burmese Pythons and the Argentine Black and White Tegu. And we'll learn more about FGCU's Campus Naturalist program with student Shawn Brunelle.

Kim Bassos-Hull/Mote Marine Laboratory

New information about whale shark behavior, biology, and ecology is being released today in the scientific journal BioScience. The 22 year long citizen-science effort has given researchers a whole new understanding of the global behavior of endangered whale sharks. We’re joined by one of those researchers. Dr. Robert Hueter is a Senior Scientist and Director of the Center for Shark Research, and the Perry W. Gilbert Chair in Shark Research, at Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium in Sarasota.

Lawrence Jackson / Obama White House Archives


This Friday is World AIDS Day, which has been observed on Dec. 1 since its inception in 1988. The '80s were the peak of the AIDS crisis and all of the stigmas and misinformation that came with it, but by the end of the decade, World AIDS Day was instituted to raise awareness of HIV/AIDS and show support to those living with HIV.

University of Florida: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

The University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is celebrating the 100th anniversary of its Citrus Research Education Center on Wednesday. We’re joined by the center’s director, Dr. Michael Rogers, to talk about this century old partnership between scientists and the citrus industry.

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