Rachel Iacovone

Gulf Coast Live Associate Producer, Reporter

Rachel Iacovone is a reporter and associate producer of Gulf Coast Live for WGCU News. Rachel came to WGCU as an intern in 2016, during the presidential race. She went on to cover Florida Gulf Coast University students at President Donald Trump's inauguration on Capitol Hill and Southwest Floridians in attendance at the following day's Women's March on Washington.

Rachel was first contacted by WGCU when she was managing editor of FGCU's student-run media group, Eagle News. She helped take Eagle News from a weekly newspaper to a daily online publication with TV and radio branches within two years, winning the 2016 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award for Best Use of Multimedia in a cross-platform series she led for National Coming Out Day. She also won the Mark of Excellence Award for Feature Writing for her five-month coverage of an FGCU student's transition from male to female.

As a WGCU reporter, she produced the first radio story in WGCU's Curious Gulf Coast project, which answered the question: Does SWFL Have More Cases of Pediatric Cancer?

During Hurricane Irma, Rachel was live on air as the sun shone through the eye of the storm, as it passed over the Collier County Emergency Operations Center where she was stationed.

Rachel graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a bachelor's degree in journalism.

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

Food aid has come in many forms after Hurricane Irma, but one group brought the comfort of All-American barbecue to Southwest Florida after the storm — the unique operation called Operation BBQ Relief in Estero.

Standing in the dry parking lot in front of Germain Arena, you’d almost forget it was filled with water a week before — trapping those with unraised cars at the arena’s shelter until the remnants of Hurricane Irma finally receded.

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

Hurricane Irma made U.S. landfall more than a week ago, yet some Southwest Florida communities are still without power and running water, such as Everglades City on the southernmost tip of Collier County.

The small community is known for its airboat rides and fishing spots — and now, for taking some of the worst of Hurricane Irma’s wrath.

Governor Rick Scott stopped by Sunday afternoon to survey the damage.

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

Hurricane Irma passed through Southwest Florida more than four days ago, yet the majority of the region is still without power — and growing tired of meals made up of canned tuna and PB&Js. But, there are a few food establishments that opened right after the storm, including one local stop that doesn't actually serve food on its own.

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

The eye of Hurricane Irma made landfall as a Category 3 hurricane Sunday afternoon in Marco Island. The heart of the damage is found in Collier County.

A Southwest Florida YMCA recently spent more than a quarter of a million dollars to update its facilities for the nation’s fastest-growing sport many have never heard of.

The prominent popping sound pickleball makes can be heard at county recreation centers, public parks and, for many, in their own neighborhoods.

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