Rachel Iacovone

All Things Considered Host, Reporter

Rachel Iacovone is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News. Rachel began reporting for WGCU during the 2016 presidential race. After Election Day, she went on to cover Florida Gulf Coast University students at President Donald Trump's inauguration on Capitol Hill and Southwest Floridians in attendance at the following day's Women's March on Washington.

During Hurricane Irma, Rachel was live on air as the sun shone through the eye of the storm, as it passed over the Collier County Emergency Operations Center where she was stationed.

For her coverage of Everglades City after the storm, Rachel won the 2018 Florida AP Broadcasters award for Breaking News as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow. She also won the AP award for Sports Feature for her story about pickleball in SWFL as well as second place in the Cultural/Historical category for her coverage of education in the farmworker town of Immokalee.

Rachel graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a bachelor's degree in journalism.

Lance Cheung / United States Department of Agriculture


Now that summer break is upon us, food insecurity is hitting some Southwest Florida families especially hard. According to a recent United States Department of Agriculture study, 16.5 percent of all U.S. households with children experienced food insecurity in 2016, affecting some 6.5 million children.

Werktuigendagen Oudenaarde / Flickr

Genetically modified foods attract a lot of criticism.

Traditionally speaking, GMO, or genetically modified organism, is a term that means DNA from another organism has been added to an organism in order to make it grow better, or faster or be more resistant to things like drought or disease. But, as technology advances, new techniques are becoming available to researchers to make genetic improvements more precisely and in a way that mimics natural mutations and does not use DNA from other organisms.

Charles Sobczak

Florida is home to a wide array of flora and fauna, but not all of it is native, actually quite a lot of what you see in the wild world around you is considered to be invasive. We’re getting a lesson on Florida’s many invasives from Charles Sobczak. The Sanibel-based author will be presenting two lectures on Florida’s invasives later this month, the first one is at the downtown Fort Myers Regional Library on Monday, June 18 at 6:30 p.m. and the other is at the Gulf Gate Library in Sarasota on Friday, June 23 at 1:00 p.m. His lectures are based on information he gathered for his book, The Living Gulf Coast – A Nature Guide to Southwest Florida.

 

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

Days away from the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season and days after subtropical storm Alberto made landfall in Florida, Everglades City was still trying to piece itself back together, more than eight months after Hurricane Irma.

Photo: Rachel Iacovone, WGCU


As hurricane season approaches, storm weary gulf coasters may remember the aftermath of last year’s hurricane season, when nonprofit organizations helped fill the gaps created by delayed federal response. We sit down with Greg Luberecki, Director of Communications and Public Relations for the Gulf Coast Community Foundation, which activated its Disaster Fund last year in the wake of Hurricane Irma, to discuss the roles nonprofits can play in disaster recovery. And, we get a report from WGCU's Rachel Iacovone who checked back in with a Hurricane Irma survivor in Everglades City.

 

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