Regan McCarthy

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x374

Regan McCarthy is the Assignment Editor and Senior News Producer for WFSU News/ Florida Public Radio. Before coming to Tallahassee, Regan graduated with honors from Indiana University’s Ernie Pyle School of Journalism. She worked for several years for NPR member station WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., where she covered local and state government and produced feature and community stories. She has also worked for the London Business Matters Magazine and the Rochester Sentinel, a daily local newspaper. She is the recipient of six professional broadcast awards including first-place Best Radio Feature from the Indiana chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.  When she isn’t tracking leading newsmakers she spends her time knitting, reading, strolling through the woods and brunching at new restaurants.  Follow Regan McCarthy on Twitter: @Regan_McCarthy

With the state’s energy portfolio surpassing 60 percent natural gas, Florida’s utility regulators are pushing for greater diversity.

Springtime in North Florida means blooming flowers, trips to the beach and more active black bears. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officials are encouraging residents to take precautions as bears come out of hibernation. To keep bears out of neighborhoods, Dave Telesco, who directs the FWC’s Bear Management Program recommends ensuring bears can’t get into the garbage.

As the temperatures warm and more families head out doors, the Leon County Health Department is reminding residents to protect themselves from risk of rabies exposure by avoiding contact with wild animals. Christopher Tittel is a spokesman for the agency.

Florida Wildlife Officials are considering an executive order to keep so called “Injurious wildlife species” from being brought into the state. Paul Grey works with Audubon Florida. He says the order is important since Florida is especially susceptible to the negative impact of invasive species.

Hundreds of people signed up Tuesday night to be heard on a Leon County firearm ordinance. The county approved a new rule that requires background checks and a waiting period for private guns sales.

Pages