Sam Turken

After living in North Carolina the past four years, Miami native Sam Turken is back in the city he’s always called home.

Sam is a proud Miami Beach Senior High alum and a recent graduate of Duke University where he studied journalism, public policy and history. He caught the public radio bug three years ago when he covered a gun buyback in Miami while on his spring break. Since then, he’s produced audio pieces on race, social justice and public housing. He enjoys using sound to tell rich and intimate stories.

A former managing editor of The Duke Chronicle, Sam has digital experience covering a range of other topics. He’s investigated the absence of female managers in Duke men’s basketball program and reported on enrollment imbalances within public schools in Durham, N.C. He’s also interned with WBUR in Boston and Fusion, written for the Raleigh News & Observer and worked for the Duke Reporters’ Lab.

When Sam isn’t doing journalism things, he enjoys the outdoors. He runs, plays tennis and soccer and spends time around the bay and ocean—something he wasn’t able to do while in college. You may also spot him riding his bike around Miami’s streets.

South Florida beneficiaries of a program that has protected more than 300,000 immigrants are bracing for the division of their families when the protection expires.

And activists say their fears have been heightened after watching the federal government's separation of migrant families who have crossed the Mexico border illegally.

The Trump administration announced last year that it's ending Temporary Protected Status for Hondurans, Haitians, Nicaraguans and Salvadorans. The program has shielded them from deportation. 

Miami mayor Francis Suarez will visit a detention facility in Tornillo, Texas on Thursday to see children who have been separated from their families after crossing the Mexico border illegally. 

South Florida's unemployment rates dropped more than half a percent in the past year, according to job figures released Friday by the Department of Economic Opportunity, contributing to a shortage of labor and rising wages in some industries.

South Florida residents are more at risk of injury and death from defective airbags than people in other parts of the country, according to federal transportation officials.

Florida also ranks third in unrepaired vehicles with faulty airbags from the Japanese maker Takata, with more than 1.4 million defective airbags still in use. That compounds the fact that the region's climate makes the airbags more unpredictable and dangerous, officials say. 

Gun violence activists gathered in Miami this weekend as part of a national campaign to honor victims of shootings. 

  

Pages