Sascha Cordner

Phone: (850) 487-3086  x404

Sascha Cordner worked at NPR member station WUFT-FM in Gainesville for several years. She's worked in both TV and radio, serving in various capacities as a reporter, producer and anchor. She's also a graduate of the University of Florida with a bachelor's degree in telecommunications.  She has received several  Florida Associated Press Broadcasters Awards with one of her award-winning stories titled "Male Breast Cancer: Lost in the Sea of Pink."  Currently, Sascha serves as the host and producer of local and state news content for the afternoon news program "All Things Considered" at WFSU.  Sascha primarily covers criminal justice and social services issues. When she's not reporting, Sascha likes catching up on her favorite TV shows, singing and reading. Follow Sascha Cordner on Twitter: @SaschaCordner.

While a new law allows Florida schools to arm their teachers, the Leon County School Board has unanimously approved a resolution stating they won’t be doing that in their school district.

Florida’s U.S. Senator Marco Rubio says the brother of the Parkland mass school shooter is a prime example of why other states should follow Florida and use gun violence protection orders. Rubio and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson are partnering on a “Red Flag” bill.

Florida’s new gun safety law includes the creation of a commission tasked with investigating the failings that led up to last month’s mass school shooting in Parkland. Governor Rick Scott and Florida legislative leaders made their appointments Tuesday.

After passing the Florida legislature last week, Governor Rick Scott decided to sign the gun safety legislation into law. Earlier in the week, he told reporters he’d wait before signing it, until he talked to the families who were impacted by the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High school.

The Florida House has now teed up gun safety legislation for a vote, in response to last month’s mass shooting at a South Florida high school. They agreed Tuesday to take up the Senate version of the bill that narrowly passed Monday. While language was stripped from that bill to exclude most classroom teachers, opponents argue the “compromise” could still arm school staff, like coaches.

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