Wilson Sayre

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Florida has one of the largest prison populations in the U.S. As of 2016, there were 99,000 people incarcerated in the state. The number peaked in 2011 with roughly 102,300 people in prison.

There’s more unrest at Miami International Airport. More than 300 food workers have filed complaints alleging their employers have been underpaying them.

Workers with LSG Sky Chefs and Gate Gourmet said the underpayments date back to 2006. The employees of these companies, contractors of major airlines  - Sky Chef's main client is American Airlines - say their employers are violating the Living Wage Ordinance. 

Film and TV productions will get some incentives to shoot in Miami-Dade County. A stop-gap county-based program hopes to plug some of the hole created by the state’s refusal to implement its own Florida-wide benefits.

Update 7/19/2017: The county has approved the establishment of an incentive program. Read more here.

The film industry may soon find it more appealing to make TV shows and movies in Miami-Dade County as commissioners consider a county-based film incentive program.

More than 100 workers at Miami International Airport are striking for 24 hours.

Subcontractors tasked with handling baggage, curbside check-in and pushing wheelchairs for various airlines are walking off the job in protest of what they say are violations of the Miami-Dade County living-wage ordinance.

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