Wilson Sayre

Wilson Sayre was born and bred in Raleigh, N.C., home of the only real barbecue in the country (we're talking East here). She graduated from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where she studied Philosophy.

Sayre took a year off school to live in a Zen monastery in Japan and quickly realized that a life of public radio would be a bit more forgiving. Upon returning to the States, she helped launch a news program at UNC’s college-radio station, WXYC. Through error and error, she taught herself how to make radio stories.

She worked with NPR member station WUNC in Chapel Hill, interning for The Story with Dick Gordon. Then she went on to help to run WUNC's Youth Radio Institute, teaching at-risk teenagers how to make radio.

Sayre likes to keep chickens, pickle okra and make sound collages.

Sayre initially came down to WLRN in 2013 for a reporting fellowship. After that, she decided she couldn't leave. She's continued her a mission to get more Miamians to wear overalls and say y'all.

Houses in areas prone to natural disasters across the country are increasing in value.

While that might not make sense, that was the finding of a yearly nationwide study by ATTOM Data Solutions, a company dedicated to crunching housing numbers.

After Hurricane Irma, there have been lots of conversations about how best to rebuild given the area's elevation and tendency to flood, even on sunny days.

This is a developing story. We'll update the post with more information as we receive it.

Miami city officials are evacuating residents who live near a crane that Hurricane Irma collapsed. The crane, on NE 30th Terrace near 5th Avenue was part of construction of the Gran Paraiso building, which is being developed by the Related Group, with construction by Plaza Construction.

Miami police intends to involuntarily commit homeless individuals starting Friday if they refuse to move off the streets. Volunteer outreach teams through the Miami-Dade County Homeless Trust began placing individuals in shelters Tuesday morning and will continue those efforts through Thursday.

Low-wage jobs in Florida are one of the main reasons families live in poverty or near poverty, according to a new study by Florida International University.

The yearly report, “State of Working Florida,” found Florida’s economy to be unbalanced and unequal.

While unemployment numbers are down statewide, that has not made a dent in income disparity across the state.

After a five and a half hour-long public comment and discussion, the city of Hollywood decided to rename streets that bear the names of Confederate icons.

Pages