Gulf Coast Live on WGCU

Weekdays at 1PM (encore Sundays at 11am)

Gulf Coast Live is a live, locally produced, call-in radio show focusing on issues that matter to Southwest Floridians. It's your chance to share your thoughts and connect to your community, live on the radio, and interact with experts, decision makers and each other via phone calls and social media.

Hosted by: Julie Glenn
Produced by: Matthew F. Smith

Call:  1-877-GCU-TALK 
Facebook: WGCU Public Media
Twitter: twitter.com/wgcu - #GCL

Gulf Coast Live is funded by the Elizabeth B. McGraw Foundation

Photo: Eleanor-Ann Davis, Pond Watch volunteer

South Florida's clean water crisis often focuses on large-scale topics like Lake Okeechobee, but Southwest Florida water watchers say the conversation must also include smaller-scale bodies of water: the health of ponds, lakes, and canals that dot the landscape across the region.

Photo: Sen. Mitch McConnell's office via Facebook

The U.S. Senate could vote by July on a bill that promises sweeping changes to health care in America. The Better Care Reconciliation Act, a replacement for the Affordable Care Act (often called Obamacare), promises to reduce the federal deficit by hundreds of billions of dollars. It could also strip healthcare from 15 million Americans by 2018. Other proposed cuts to Medicaid likely see that number grow.

Photo: Conservancy of Southwest Florida

Few animals arouse the instinct to hunt quite like the Burmese Python. The invasive species has slithered across the Everglades and into every corner of South Florida, taking over habitat from native species and consuming thousands of pounds of prey animals. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/diversey/28205105385
Photo: Tony Webster via Flickr Creative Commons

The Tampa Bay Times spent four years compiling what it calls "Florida's most comprehensive database of police shootings." Data from nearly 400 law enforcement agencies across Florida reveal startling racial disparities: forty-one percent of people shot by police were black, despite making up 15 percent of the state's population.

Photo: CDC.gov

SIDS, or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, has long been the sad epitaph to explain the unexplainable: the inexplicable death of otherwise healthy babies. Improvements in health care and education have pushed SIDS out of the headlines in recent years, but researchers continue their efforts to better understand and ultimately end SIDS in our lifetime.  

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