Gulf Coast Live on WGCU

Weekdays at 1PM (encore Sundays at 11am)

Gulf Coast Live is a live, locally produced, call-in radio show focusing on issues that matter to Southwest Floridians. It's your chance to share your thoughts and connect to your community, live on the radio, and interact with experts, decision makers and each other via phone calls and social media.

Hosted by: Julie Glenn
Produced by: Rachel Iacovone

Call:  1-877-GCU-TALK 
Facebook: WGCU Public Media
Twitter: twitter.com/wgcu - #GCL

Gulf Coast Live is funded by the Elizabeth B. McGraw Foundation

When President George W. Bush asked New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson to travel North Korea on a diplomatic mission he took a group of experts with him. One person who joined that delegation was Florida Gulf Coast University President Mike Martin, who was the education expert. We sat down with President Martin to learn more about his time in North Korea, and what insights he brought back with him.

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It is officially mosquito season here in southwest Florida. But, what we experience these days is nothing like what we’d experience if it weren’t for mosquito control. Today on the show we’re joined by Eric Jackson, he's Public Information Officer with the Lee County Mosquito Control District, to learn what lengths they go to to try and reduce the numbers of these flying pests. And we’re joined by Dr. Jonathan Day, he's Professor of Medical Entomology at the University of Florida to find out why mosquitos feast on some people and not others.

Ocean Habitats, Inc.

We’re joined by David Wolff, founder of a nonprofit company called Ocean Habitats that’s creating and selling mini artificial reefs that are generally installed behind homes underneath docks. The basic idea is to create safe habitats for juvenile fish and crabs, and other marine life, to grow and thrive. His company has installed hundreds of mini reefs on Marco Island, and recently installed the first one behind a home in Fort Myers.

Tara Calligan, WGCU

On today’s encore edition of “Gulf Coast Live!” we listen back to a live in-studio performance from members of the Southwest Florida-based band Soulixer.  The band performs prolifically at venues throughout the region and delivers a high-energy mix of soul/funk/rock music with influences including The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sublime, Mos Def, James Brown and Cage The Elephant.  We’ll feature music and conversation with band members Cayce Dillard (drums), Thomas O'Brien (guitar & vocals) and Mason Reinek (bass).

Plus, we listen back to our May conversation with award-winning and multi-faceted guitarist John Housley upon the release of his new album of Nuevo Flamenco music “The Heart’s Furnace.”  Housley has been playing and teaching guitar since his early teen years.  He also founded the Ann Arbor Academy of Music, which averaged some 400 students per week under his leadership.  In 1995, he joined the multi-platinum winning southern rock band Blackfoot before eventually making his way back to Southwest Florida where he teaches and plays with the highly popular modern rock band A200. However, this represents just one aspect of Housley’s musical talents and interests.  In addition to writing and producing music, he’s repertoire spans the history of the guitar with an emphasis on the Spanish guitar style exemplified by  composers such as Tarrega, Villa Lobos, Sor, and Carcassi along with classical composers such as Bach, and Debussy.  We’ll explore Housley’s life in music and hear selections from his new album of classic guitar songs in the Nuevo Flamenco style.

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Summertime is here, and for many families that means time at the pool, or at the beach -- but it also means an increased risk for drowning. About 1,000 kids die each year in the U.S. from drowning, and another 7,000 go to the emergency room because of a non-fatal drowning event. And, while pool safety for little kids often gets the most attention, statistically speaking it is far more likely for a kid to die from drowning in open waters, like at the beach, or on a lake in a river. And it’s actually teenage boys who are most likely to drown this way. We're joined by Sally Kreuscher, she’s a Child Advocate with Lee Health and a local SafeKids Coordinator, to get some drowning prevention tips.

 

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