Calusa Indians

Photo: Florida Musuem of Natural History

Dr. William H. Marquardt was awarded a lifetime achievement award by the Southeastern Archeological Conference for his "significant and sustained contributions to southeastern archeology" during his career. He was given the award during the conference's October 2016 meeting.

Matlack Collection, HistoryMiami

The Tamiami Trail refers to the southernmost 264 mile portion of U.S. Highway 41 stretching from Tampa to Miami.  Construction of the east-west portion of the road through the Everglades was considered a monumental feat of engineering.  On Saturday, April 25 the Museum of the Everglades recognizes the 87th anniversary of the opening of the Tamiami Trail with a series of events including a lecture by Melissa Timo with the Florida Public Archeology Network titled, “The Tamiami Trail and Other Projects of Profound and Unintended Consequence:  The Archaeology of How Humans Have Shaped the Southwest Florida Landscape.”  

Art by Merald Clark, Courtesy Florida Museum of Natural History

The Florida Museum of Natural History has purchased two Calusa Indian mounds on Pine Island. This addition could impact the region’s awareness of 350 to 1000-year-old Calusa culture.

The Randell Research Center on Pine Island will soon be able to add 5 acres to its interpretive trail. The new land contains a burial mound and a midden, a type of ancient trash pile.

Credit Genista via Flickr Creative Commons

Fort Myers Beach officials are currently working to make the Mound Key Archeological State Park officially part of the town.  The largely undisturbed shell mound in Estero Bay was believed to be a ceremonial center for the Calusa Indians who historically controlled much of South Florida until the arrival of European explorers.

Bob Reid / Flickr / Creative Commons

A group of archeologists have uncovered remnants of ancient Calusa Indians in Marco Island this week. They also might have found evidence of an even older occupation dating back even further.