Cancer

Updated Feb. 20, 12:34 p.m.

University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute treated nearly 200 kids with cancer last year. Now doctors there are hoping a new app will help young patients prepare before they arrive for treatment.

 

The Proton U App was developed by UF Health child life specialist Kim Todd. It’s an interactive storybook that introduces kids to the hospital environment to make treatment less intimidating.

 


Researchers at Tampa's Moffitt Cancer Center are testing a vaccine to fight breast cancer,  and they say  that it appears to be working for some patients.

Photo: National Cancer Institute via Wikimedia Commons

Thousands of cancer patients lack a ride to the treatments they need to stay alive. Some lack access to a vehicle, while others are too sick to drive themselves or use public transportation. Cancer patients may also face acute dietary restrictions or nutrition needs during and after their treatment.

That's all on top of the costly and time-consuming efforts of ensuring the battle with cancer is covered by health insurance.

A campaign is currently underway in Florida to educate parents about a childhood vaccine that can prevent cancers associated with the sexually-transmitted human papillomavirus, or HPV, in adulthood.

Topher Forhecz/WGCU

Researchers are looking into a new way to fight cancer. Their source weighs thousands of pounds, has four legs and a trunk.

They’re elephants, and they rarely get cancer.  

The Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus’ elephant retirement facility in Central Florida teamed up with the researchers to figure out why. They hope they can use their research to help people.

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