Documentary

Photo: Wikimedia Creative Commons

As PBS stations across the country continue airing the ten-park, 18-hour documentary series The Vietnam War, veterans advocates across the nation are using the moment to reach out to vets who may be seeking help, a person to discuss their military service with, or coming to terms with undiagnosed trauma, including post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD.

Photos: Karen Hirsh (left) / Lt. Jack Carollo, U.S. Army


This month PBS stations across the country are in the midsts of airing The Vietnam War, a ten-part, 18-hour documentary film series directed by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick.  The series strives to offer a comprehensive view of the war and the social and political environment of the 1960s. On Gulf Coast Live, we're also offering a unique perspective on the war from a one-time Army combat correspondent.

Photo: Matthew F. Smith, WGCU

On Memorial Day, Gulf Coast Live looks back at the Vietnam War through a panel discussion held with several veterans recently at WGCU. 

Photo: Roman Harak via Flickr Creative Commons

North Korea dominates headlines for it's missile programs, assassinations, and other acts that have earned it the nickname as "the Hermit Kingdom." But a new documentary screening at Florida Gulf Coast University Thursday, Apr. 6 at 7 p.m. hopes to show how a new generation of North Korean millennials are challenging the nation's ruling elite and may be the country's best hope for change.

Photo: Great Florida Cattle Drive

Florida's cattle culture dates back nearly 500 years, from the first cattle unloaded by Spanish sailors near present-day Port Charlotte, to the cattle-driving "cow hunters" of the 19th century, to the modern-day industry that tops more than 1  billion head of cattle in the state and boasts one of the largest commercial cattle herds in the country.

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