emergency response

Photo: NASA

Hurricane Irma cut a swath of blackouts through Florida, from the Keys to multiple counties across the peninsula. An estimated 4.4 million people were without power as days became weeks. That's led some Floridians to consider turning to renewable energy like solar power, installing large-scale battery backups at home, and keeping solar contractors busy as more residents think about going "off the grid" to power their homes.

Photo: Jessica Meszaros, WGCU

Hurricane Irma and the massive bands of wind and rain the rocked Southwest Florida has moved north, but in the aftermath of the storm, hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power and the toll of the hurricane is beginning to come into focus as emergency responders begin assessments and repairs.

Photo: Quincy Walters, WGCU

As southwest Florida begins to feel the impacts of Hurricane Irma, emergency mangers in Lee County say they have stopped responding to calls due to dangerous wind speeds. Law enforcement will also stop responding soon.

Image: NOAA

Powerful Hurricane Irma is racing toward a direct impact with South Florida by early Sunday. Forecasters say the storm poses a “potentially catastrophic threat” to the Florida Keys and other parts of our state, with hurricane and storm surge warnings and watches already in effect on both the Gulf and Atlantic coasts.

Photo: Max Pixel via Public Domain

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Hurricane Center issues its 2017 Hurricane season outlook Thursday. NOAA meteorologist Jamie Rhome explains what’s in store for Southwest Florida in the months ahead.  

Pages