Environmental Policy

The Sagemont School / Instagram


They’re not yet old enough to vote, but they want to hold the state accountable for how its treated environmental issues.

Photo: Eleanor-Ann Davis, Pond Watch volunteer

South Florida's clean water crisis often focuses on large-scale topics like Lake Okeechobee, but Southwest Florida water watchers say the conversation must also include smaller-scale bodies of water: the health of ponds, lakes, and canals that dot the landscape across the region.

Images: March for Science

A march designed to defend the role science plays in "our health, safety, economies, and governments" is taking place Saturday—Earth Day—in Washington, D.C., and like related marches in recent months, the Science March is being supported by thousands of satellite marches across the nation, including several in South Florida.

Image: U.S. Geological Survey via Wikimedia Commons

Scientists say the earth has entered a new geological epoch, one defined by humanity's growing impact on the planet, climate, and ecosystems. The proposed name for the possible new epoch is the Anthropocene, and scientists say they're concerned about what this "era of man" means for the plants and animals disappearing or facing extinction during these rapid changes in the natural world.

It's a concern that's bringing scientists in Southwest Florida together for a biodiversity conference at FGCU next week.

Photo: Rachel Iacovone, WGCU

Author and environmental advocate Terry Tempest Williams, speaking at two engagements in Southwest Florida this week, revisits her idea of essential common ground for dialogue from her 2004 book, "The Open Space of Democracy."

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