Felons

Fewer felons are getting their voting rights restored under Governor Rick Scott than in the past two administrations. Attorney Brittnie Baker said Scott has denied her clients the right to once again vote because of traffic violations or admitting they drank or used drugs.

Miami-Dade elections workers test ballot machines in preparation for early voting in November 2014.
MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Losing the right to vote after being convicted of a felony leaves six million Americans unable to cast a ballot in U.S. elections. A new report from the Brennan Center for Justice finds 1.6 million of those felons without the ability to vote are in Florida, whose only chance to regain the right to vote is a complex process that "in recent years has denied all but a few hundred applicants."

Renata Sago, WMFE

A statewide coalition of pastors, attorneys, and former felons says in this key election year Florida Governor Rick Scott and other state lawmakers need to put 1.5 million former felons back on the voter rolls. Members of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition dropped off a petitions with 7,000 signatures to the Orange County elections office Monday, the last day for Floridians to register for the August 30th primary.

The Legislature is loosening its get-tough-on-crime attitude, allowing more non-violent juveniles to avoid felony records. Figures show Governor Rick Scott and the Cabinet are going in the opposite direction when it comes to restoring civil rights for ex-felons.

Locals Testify On Florida's Voting Problems

Apr 1, 2014
Sage Ross via Flickr

The National Commission on Voting Rights met at the University of Miami yesterday. National and local experts on voting law heard witness testimony on voter discrimination and election administration problems.  Each of the 15 witnesses spoke for about five minutes.

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