Hurricane

Hurricane Irma was a game-changer for South Florida. Cities are preparing for hurricane season differently now. And the region’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light, is pushing for a method that could turn the lights back on faster after a storm.

It’s called undergrounding. A lot of people think of it as the solution for keeping the power on. But that’s not necessarily how it works.

With hurricane season in full swing, staff at Florida's evacuation shelters are busy making preparations like what to do for specials needs evacuees and where to send victims of domestic violence. But this year they're practicing for a new issue — what to do if immigration officials want to take a look around.

The newspaper headline for August 28, 2019, reads: “Category 5 Hurricane Expected to Hit Homestead, South Miami in Three Days.”

Leaders from Florida’s 67 counties will learn about a buzzword this week: resilience.

"It’s about understanding your neighbors, that their shortfalls may become your problem, and their assets may also be a solution to your problem," said State Rep. Kristin Jacobs, organizer of a panel on resilience at this week's Florida Association of Counties meeting in Orlando.

Jacobs said one goal is to talk with county leaders and state Department of Environment Secretary Noah Valenstein about collaborative solutions to common challenges, including hurricane evacuations. 

Just as the company says it’s hardening the power grid against future hurricanes, Florida Power & Light is also making some of its service centers more resilient against storm damages. 

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