Hurricane Irma

The Florida Keys have been in an affordable housing crisis for years. It’s a simple matter of limited supply and very high demand. Then, in September, Hurricane Irma destroyed or caused major damage to thousands of homes — more than 7 percent of the homes in the Keys were destroyed or suffered major damage.

Quincy J. Walters / WGCU News

It’s been a little over four months since Hurricane Irma hit Southwest Florida, but many people still need help and don’t know where to turn. And there’s a group canvassing neighborhoods to try and create a network of assistance for people who may have given up.

On an early morning one day this week, a group of five people in yellow t-shirts stopped by the Iona McGregor Fire Station in Fort Myers.

Jimmy Patronis's Twitter Account

We’re joined by Florida’s CFO Jimmy Patronis to explore what recourse you have if your insurance company still hasn’t covered your hurricane-related claims. He’s head of the Florida Division of Consumer Services, whose insurance specialists are standing by 24 hours a day to field consumer complaints. Once a complaint has been filed, insurance companies, by statute, have just 20 days to respond to the Department. You can find out what your rights are as a residential property policyholder in the Homeowner Claims Bill of Rights.

And, we’ll chat with someone from the Better Business Bureau about what you can do if a contractor has left you and your hurricane damage in the lurch.

Amy Bennett Williams

News-Press storyteller Amy Bennett Williams is a well-known local history buff, so it should come as no surprise that her post-Hurricane Irma damage surveyance would include the loss of what are perhaps some lesser-known touchstones to our region’s history.  For Williams, that includes lamenting the loss of an iconic Monkey Puzzle tree planted some one hundred years ago at the Koreshan Unity settlement site in Estero.

FPL Delays Plan To Recoup Irma Costs

Jan 4, 2018

After saying in October it expected to collect an estimated $1.3 billion, Florida Power & Light has put on hold a plan to bill customers for the costs of restoring electricity after Hurricane Irma.

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