Hurricane Irma

There is still a chance for some people to sign up for D-SNAP disaster food assistance in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

Rachel Iacovone / WGCU

The LaBelle Silver Spurs 4-H Club took on a daunting task this summer — to train wild horses to become adoptable within 100 days. Hurricane Irma pushed back the club’s auction, though, for two extra months, and the mustangs are, now, hardly recognizable.

Quincy J Walters / WGCU News

It’s been over two months since Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, but Floridians are still dealing with mold and many are just now discovering they have it.

Update 11/20 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved Florida to conduct telephone interviews for individuals who pre-registered for DSNAP who also have a disability or who are over the age of 60. The lawsuit is continuing to push for registration possibilities for people who do not meet that criteria.

After Hurricane Irma, the federal government offered a food assistance program to Floridians who needed help because of the storm. The signup period for that program ended last week.

But there’s an ongoing lawsuit that might reopen registration for some people with disabilities because, the suit claims, the lines to sign up were prohibitively long.

South Florida lost a lot of trees during Hurricane Irma. While Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties avoided a direct hit, the storm managed to topple  palm and other canopy trees, littering the streets with tree trunks, branches and palm fronds.

One month later, the debris from the trees and shrubbery remains on the curb or street waiting to be picked up. 

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