Local

Quincy J Walters / WGCU News

It’s been over two months since Hurricane Irma made landfall in Florida, but Floridians are still dealing with mold and many are just now discovering they have it.

Gov. Rick Scott on Tuesday proposed an $87.4 billion election-year budget, in his final opportunity to set the state’s priorities before he leaves office in about 400 days.

It’s by far the largest budget Scott has proposed since he took office seven years ago, and it is sure to undergo wholesale change when the annual legislative session begins on Jan. 9.

“I’m going to fight every day for Florida families,” Scott said at an announcement at Northern Tool in Jacksonville. “But we cannot stop now. We have to have another good budget.”

It took Miami-Dade County’s school board 30 rounds of voting before a majority agreed on its next chair: Perla Tabares Hantman.

For about an hour of sometimes tense exchanges, the nine-member board struggled over two directions: electing an experienced chief, or providing new opportunities to those who haven’t had a chance to lead. Hantman has already served in the post for nine years cumulatively.

Update 11/20 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved Florida to conduct telephone interviews for individuals who pre-registered for DSNAP who also have a disability or who are over the age of 60. The lawsuit is continuing to push for registration possibilities for people who do not meet that criteria.

After Hurricane Irma, the federal government offered a food assistance program to Floridians who needed help because of the storm. The signup period for that program ended last week.

But there’s an ongoing lawsuit that might reopen registration for some people with disabilities because, the suit claims, the lines to sign up were prohibitively long.

Dentists graduate with a lot of student loan debt. That means it's hard for them to set up in rural areas where people might not have much money -- or health insurance.

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