Nursing Homes

Calling the Hurricane Irma-related deaths of eight people in South Florida a preventable tragedy, a Plantation Democrat wants to force nursing homes to have a five-day emergency power supply. 

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson says the state needs to make sure its monitoring nursing homes. Eight residents died in a sweltering south Florida nursing home after Hurricane Irma knocked out power.

“The ALF’s and nursing homes are patrolled, regulated by the state of Florida.  And so there’s going to be some hell to pay, because they are going to have to tighten down on the regulations to make sure the nursing homes for the frail, elderly are doing the job,” said Nelson Friday at a stop in Apopka.

The number of nursing homes in Florida still without power stood at 64 midday Thursday — down from about 400 that lost power due to Hurricane Irma, according to the Florida Health Care Association.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/saltimir/7330554070
Photo: Salvador Altimir via Flickr Creative Commons

A growing number of states, including Florida, are contracting our long-term medical care with what's known as managed care organizations.

It's a way for states to consolidate care for large groups, ranging from pregnant women, to people with specific disabilities, to long-term care for aging Floridians. And it's increasingly changing the way states spend Medicaid dollars, and how the aging or disabled access healthcare. Providers in Southwest Florida say its also limiting their abilities to give patients the care they need.

Photo: Jeffrey Smith via Flickr Creative Commons

South Florida is home to some of the grayest counties in the country, and as more seniors face critical decisions about where and how they live, questions about what programs seniors can take advantage and the kind of care available in Southwest Florida are common.

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