Pollution

WMFE, Amy Green

Florida is the nation’s largest producer of sugar cane, responsible for half of the country’s crop. Sugar’s environmental impact here is bitterly debated as work now begins among the sprawling fields south of Lake Okeechobee on a reservoir aimed at Everglades restoration.

A quarter of the nation’s sugar comes from Florida’s Everglades Agricultural Area. Here where the river of grass once flowed cane fields stretch to every horizon, green and swaying.

Just imagine that you’re sitting in your home and you hear a loud explosion from down the street that nearly blasts your eardrums out.

And then after another 10 seconds . . .

BAM!

After 10 more seconds, another deafening blast. And another and another. Over and over again. Day and night.

That’s what many marine biologists say marine mammals will have to endure from seismic testing. 

The environmental advocacy group Miami Waterkeeper is suing Miami-Dade County for allegedly violating the Clean Water Act after finding a sewage pipe that might have been leaking into the ocean for almost a year.

The Waterkeepers filed a notice of intent to sue in 60 days. The lawsuit will ask the county to fix this leak and inspect all outfall pipes, as well as suggest that the county contribute to the Biscayne Bay restoration trust fund, instead of paying civil penalties.

Over a period of eight hours on June 20, more than 700,000 gallons of raw sewage — poop and wastewater — spilled from a 63-inch pipe on NW 155 Lane, just south of State Road 826 near the Golden Glades.   

Commissioners in Miami-Dade County and the city of Key West have voted to endorse  the Paris Climate Accord, despite President Donald Trump withdrawing the U.S. from the international agreement to cut carbon emissions earlier this month.

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