Science

Right now, if a researcher wants to confirm there’s a red tide outbreak – you know, that algae bloom known as Karenia brevis that turns water red or brown, kills marine life and makes a horrible stench – they have to take a water sample, bring it back to the lab, put it on a microscope, and literally count the number of algae cells.

Photo: Forest Wander via Flicker Creative Commons / https://www.flickr.com/photos/forestwander-nature-pictures/7224224332

Fundraising effort are underway for the humble honey bee, as the University of Florida’s Honey Bee Research and Extension Laboratory reaches toward just shy of its $3.5 million goal to build a state-of the-art facility for scholars and Florida beekeepers to study the behavior, husbandry, ecology, biodiversity, and conservation of the honey bee.

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While the temptation is great, don’t stare at Monday’s solar eclipse without the right eye protection.  That’s according to Dr. Alexandra Konowal who joins Gulf Coast Live today.  We’ll ask exactly what makes a solar eclipse so dangerous for eyes and learn how our understanding of its effects has grown since the last total solar blackout- 38 years ago.

Photo: Pixabay via Public Domain

A saliva swab collected from a patient’s cheek can tell doctors what kinds of drugs will work best for a patient. It's the promise of pharmacogenomics, the science behind matching a patient's genetic profile with right medicine—and avoiding drugs that could actually harm them.

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We often hear that trees and rainforests and plant life are the things that make our planet breathe- taking in Carbon Dioxide and releasing Oxygen. It happens at the smallest level on leaves- but have you ever wondered exactly what’s happening in each of these leaves? Have you ever considered the long-buried leaves from millennia ago- ancient forests which are now mined as other products like rubber, coal and oil?

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