Voting

Fewer felons are getting their voting rights restored under Governor Rick Scott than in the past two administrations. Attorney Brittnie Baker said Scott has denied her clients the right to once again vote because of traffic violations or admitting they drank or used drugs.

Photo: U.S. Library of Congress via Wikimedia Commons

Organizers behind Vision 2020 have set for themselves a bold goal: 100 percent turnout of eligible women voters in the November 2020 national election.

Launched after a meeting last month at Drexel University that sought "to bring about political parity for women," a group of women from Southwest Florida helped shape the project, and will bring a Vision 2020 National Congress to Florida next year. The effort is making a push in Florida through local organizations including the League of Women Voters and the Southwest Florida Community Foundation.

Miami-Dade elections workers test ballot machines in preparation for early voting in November 2014.
MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Losing the right to vote after being convicted of a felony leaves six million Americans unable to cast a ballot in U.S. elections. A new report from the Brennan Center for Justice finds 1.6 million of those felons without the ability to vote are in Florida, whose only chance to regain the right to vote is a complex process that "in recent years has denied all but a few hundred applicants."

On the heels of the 2016 presidential election lawmakers are reviewing what went well while looking toward some changes.

Voters around the Tampa Bay area are heading to the polls today to decide several key races. Follow WUSF staff and journalism students from the University of South Florida as we bring you live coverage.

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