Women

Waving signs reading “Nasty Women Unite,” and “Choose Love,” thousands of marchers poured into downtown St. Petersburg Saturday to support women’s issues and civil rights. It was one of hundreds of “sister marches” happening the day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, as a protest to his agenda. 

Image: womensmarch.com

On Saturday, Jan. 21—the day after the presidential office transitions to new Commander in Chief—millions of women are set to converge on the U.S. Capitol for the Women's March on Washington. Despite the proximity to the inauguration of president-elect Donald Trump, organizers say the march is not a protest of the incoming president but rather a way to focus attention on "a multitude of social justice and human rights issues."

Photo: Microsoft Ignite NZ

When it comes to the welfare of Florida women, the Sunshine State gets a D+.

A new report from the Institute for Women's Policy Research found more women live in poverty and without access to health insurance than elsewhere in the nation. Florida also fell behind other states when it comes to a woman's access to education and economic opportunity.

 

Florida is among the worst states for women living in poverty. A report out this month by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and the Florida Women’s Funding Alliance finds 41.5 percent of single women with children are in poverty in our state.

 

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