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Hurricane Ian's destruction providing decent-paying jobs

Matlache 05.JPG
Tom James
/
WGCU
Debris strewn along Pine Island Road heading toward the washed out Matlacha bridge.

Did you ever wonder how “they” come up with a complicated estimate of something, like the tons of debris create by Hurricane Ian, which hit Lee County as a Category 4 tropical cyclone Sept. 28?

A Lake Mary-based company helping to compile that figure is in a hiring blitz, turning Hurricane Ian into an opportunity to earn as much as $1,300 a week.

Call the position a Post-Cyclonic Rubbish Removal Quality Control Specialist, but the reality is far less fancy: stand around and watch trash collectors collect trash. And write it down.

Thompson Consulting Services needs people to document how much hurricane-related debris is collected by companies Lee County has hired to haul away all the tree limbs, coconuts, garbage, and other debris. The job is not collecting the trash, but counting the amount that others do.

“The demand is steep, which means so is the pay. There is no physical labor, no experience is necessary, and training is provided. You will document who removed debris, what type of debris was removed, where the debris was removed from and when it was removed.”
Thompson Consulting Services

The job entails long shifts, every day of the week, whether the sun is shining brightly or rain is pouring down. Interviews start in Fort Myers today.

Those who are interested must come in person to a hiring call at Jury Parking Lot, 2050 Broadway Circle in Fort Myers on Oct. 3 and Oct. 4 at 4 p.m., or Oct. 5 through Oct. 7. at 11 a.m. or at 3 p.m.

Thompson said requirements for the position include being at least 18 years old with a high school diploma or GED. Applicants must be fluent in English, have a valid driver license and safe driving history, reliable transportation, a cell phone, and must be able to work outside for long periods of time, rain or shine.

The position requires that workers be able to adapt to fluctuating works hours, and shifts may stretch for 12 hours or longer seven days a week.

Those with internet service can pre-register here.

Environmental reporting for WGCU is funded in part by VoLo Foundation, a non-profit with a mission to accelerate change and global impact by supporting science-based climate solutions, enhancing education, and improving health. 

Sign up for WGCU's monthly environmental newsletter, the Green Flash, today.

Environmental reporting for WGCU is funded in part by VoLo Foundation, a non-profit with a mission to accelerate change and global impact by supporting science-based climate solutions, enhancing education, and improving health.

Sign up for WGCU's monthly environmental newsletter, the Green Flash, today.

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