PBS and NPR for Southwest Florida
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Gulf Coast Life Square 1400x1400
Gulf Coast Life

Rates of Uninsured Children Increasing in Florida and Across the U.S.

baby_doc.jpg
Lou Bueno via Flickr Creative Commons

The number of children without out health insurance in the U.S. increased by more than 400,000 between 2016 and 2018.  A new report from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families finds that over that time period the rate of uninsured children nationwide increased from 4.7% to 5.2%, reversing what had been a long-standing positive trend in the rates of uninsured kids.  Florida is among states experiencing the sharpest increases in the number of uninsured children.

The report cites a number of examples of what is responsible for eroding children’s healthcare coverage including actions and inactions of the Trump administration, delays in funding the Children’s Health Insurance Program and a culture of fear among immigrant families.  We will take a closer look at the report’s findings with Executive Director of the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families and research professor with the McCourt School of Public Policy Joan Alker.

John Davis has been a full-time Reporter/Producer for WGCU since 2009. He is the local host for NPR’s Morning Edition and producer and host for WGCU’s radio talk program Gulf Coast Live! John came to WGCU as an intern in 2007, and is now reporting on a broad spectrum of topics of interest to Southwest Florida.  Prior to joining WGCU, he worked at WDUQ-FM in Pittsburgh, PA covering local government and general assignments.John studied journalism at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, before earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication from Florida Gulf Coast University. His work has garnered awards from the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania, the Radio Television Digital News Association, and a first place award and “Best in Show” from the Florida Associated Press for his investigative work in 2011.