Citrus Greening

Supreme Court Wants Quick Response On Citrus Veto

Jun 22, 2017

The Florida Supreme Court on Wednesday gave Gov. Rick Scott's administration until noon Monday to respond to a lawsuit challenging the governor's veto of $37.4 million intended to go to residents whose healthy citrus trees were cut down as the state tried to eradicate citrus-canker disease.

Pixabay

Florida’s citrus industry has seen its share of ups and downs, and running alongside the growers and grove owners all that time has been the Citrus Research and Education Center- which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year.

Founded in 1917 to help Florida’s citrus farmers face challenges in the field, the research center has provide scientific solutions to pests, diseases, and weather patterns for a $9 billion industry.

Florida legislators have agreed to pay millions to homeowners in two counties whose healthy citrus trees were torn down in a failed attempt to eradicate citrus canker.

Florida may drop a long-running legal battle and instead agree to pay millions to homeowners across the state whose healthy citrus trees were torn down in a failed attempt to eradicate citrus canker.

Photo: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Florida’s orange crop is less than a third what is was 20 years ago, and most farmers blame citrus greening for the decline. The greening of the iconic orange fruit is caused by bacteria spread by a tiny insect called a psyllid. The bacteria constricts the plant’s vascular system, cutting off its ability to get nutrients and leaving blotchy yellow leaves and green oranges. But now an Immokalee research group is hoping to use another insect to combat greening: lady bugs.

Pages