Guns

The first of more than 800 March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., the U.S. and around the world took place early on Saturday on the island of Pohnpei in the Pacific nation of Micronesia.

Here in South Florida, things kicked off, fittingly, in Parkland - which was the site of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people and ignited the student-led #NeverAgain movement for stricter gun control and school safety. Marches were also held in Miami Beach, Boca Raton and Key West.

Do just one percent of licensed gun dealers supply more than half the guns recovered in crimes? And is Florida one of the only states that prohibits a gun registry? WUSF's Steve Newborn gets the answers from PolitiFact Florida's Allison Graves.

Floridians will not vote on adding gun control measures to the state constitution this year because a state board, citing technical rules, rejected the proposals Wednesday.

The 37-member Constitutional Review Commission is an obscure yet powerful body that meets every 20 years to propose changes to the Florida constitution, which are then put on the November ballot. During a marathon meeting in the Capitol, several commissioners from both parties tried to add three different gun-related amendments to a proposal related to land ownership.

South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz hosted a roundtable on Monday to discuss how to keep the momentum for gun control going long after this coming Saturday's "March For Our Lives," organized by Parkland students with support from their peers around the country. 

In response to the Parkland shooting that killed 17 people, Broward County’s Charter Review Commission (CRC)  is holding a special meeting to consider proposing gun control amendments for approval by the county voters. 

The meeting is scheduled for Friday,  March 16  at 10 a.m. at the County Governmental Center in Fort Lauderdale. 

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