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A big juicy ribeye was once the anathema of 1980s low-fat dieters. People were told that fat was the culprit behind weight gain, heart disease, and all manner of health issues. But, fast forward to today, and we are embracing fat -- but not all of it -- just the good fats. Things like olive oil and avocados. But, is there good fat to be found in that ribeye? And is there more good fat or bad fat in a black Angus cow?  How about a Holstein? A Charolais?

 

We’re talking with Dr. Raluca Mateescu, she leads a team of researchers in the Animal Genetics and Genomics lab at the University of Florida. She and her team recently presented their latest research findings to the Florida Cattleman’s Association, and we're going to explore she’s been studying.

 

Werktuigendagen Oudenaarde / Flickr

Genetically modified foods attract a lot of criticism.

Traditionally speaking, GMO, or genetically modified organism, is a term that means DNA from another organism has been added to an organism in order to make it grow better, or faster or be more resistant to things like drought or disease. But, as technology advances, new techniques are becoming available to researchers to make genetic improvements more precisely and in a way that mimics natural mutations and does not use DNA from other organisms.

Tim Cowley


A new University of Florida study suggests that there could be even more felled trees the next time a hurricane makes landfall in the state — not because of the rise of super storms or stronger wind conditions but because of termites.

Xavi Moll / Unsplash

Today marks the 45th annual National Ag Day, a time to reflect on where our food comes from.

But, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences works every day to raise agricultural awareness, not only in the state of Florida but across the nation as well.