Jessica Meszaros

Host, Reporter

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She won five Florida Associated Press Broadcasters awards in 2017: Two were for light news features, including coverage of the state's wild pig meat industry, and of local conversations about death preparedness. Jessica was also recognized for her live afternoon newscast discussing Florida's controversial death penalty process, and a toxic red tide algae bloom poisoning Southwest Florida's marine life. Her live call-in talk show about LGBT legislation in Florida and the deadliest year for the transgender community also won. And finally, Jessica won as part of the WGCU news team covering a local shooting that left two teens dead

Her story on the state struggling to eradicate diseased and abandoned orange groves won an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for Excellence in Writing, and second place for Best Writing in PRNDI's Division B category in 2017. 

In 2016, she won two  Murrow regional awards for best newscast and best writing. She also won second place in the 2016 Sunshine State Awards for her general coverage of Florida's environmental issues. 

Jessica was previously a freelance multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

jmeszaros@wgcu.org

 

Topher Forhecz / WGCU News

The Florida Supreme Court will not overturn the governor’s vetoes of money the state owes some residents for destroying their citrus trees. However, justices did appear to agree the homeowners are due their compensation.

Diana Umpierre

It’s rare to see an unfiltered night sky in many parts of Florida. Artificial lights in highly populated areas, like Fort Myers or Miami, cover up views of constellations and the Milky Way. But, Big Cypress National Preserve in Ochopee is now an “International Dark Sky Park.” That means the preserve removed unnecessary lights. And the ones they kept were changed to be “night sky friendly” by using different bulbs or making the lights point down to the ground, rather than up to the sky.

Public Domain/Hans on Pixabay.com

A Lee County circuit court judge said the state agriculture department needs to repay local residents for destroyed citrus trees, or explain why it refuses to pay. The Florida Department of Agriculture has less than 40 days to respond.

Topher Forhecz / WGCU News

Residents in Lee and Broward Counties took Gov. Rick Scott to the Florida Supreme Court this week. They’re trying to overturn Scott’s vetoes of state money owed to them after agriculture officials destroyed their healthy citrus trees. The homeowners also took the state’s agriculture commissioner to lower courts.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Children in rural Hendry County are training wild horses, making them suitable for adoption. They’re challenged to discipline 12 mustangs from Nevada in 100 days. But since Gov. Rick Scott just vetoed state funding for their club, the group predicts a future financial struggle. Let's go to the ranch in LaBelle where the kids are taming these wild animals. 

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