Jessica Meszaros

Host, Reporter

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She won five Florida Associated Press Broadcasters awards in 2017: Two were for light news features, including coverage of the state's wild pig meat industry, and of local conversations about death preparedness. Jessica was also recognized for her live afternoon newscast discussing Florida's controversial death penalty process, and a toxic red tide algae bloom poisoning Southwest Florida's marine life. Her live call-in talk show about LGBT legislation in Florida and the deadliest year for the transgender community also won. And finally, Jessica won as part of the WGCU news team covering a local shooting that left two teens dead

Her story on the state struggling to eradicate diseased and abandoned orange groves won an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for Excellence in Writing, and second place for Best Writing in PRNDI's Division B category in 2017. 

In 2016, she won two  Murrow regional awards for best newscast and best writing. She also won second place in the 2016 Sunshine State Awards for her general coverage of Florida's environmental issues. 

Jessica was previously a freelance multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

jmeszaros@wgcu.org

 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Since Hurricane Irma hit Southwest Florida last week, officials in Hendry County said they've been handing out, on average, a couple semi-trucks of food and water per day. They were also giving away ice, tarps and other necessities Tuesday at the Dallas B. Townsend Agricultural Center in LaBelle.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Hurricane Irma destroyed farms and groves all around Hendry County. An agriculture expert says 78 percent of the adult population in Hendry works in the ag industry.  Irma damages will affect everyone from growers to grocery stores.

Hendry County is asking for donations of food and supplies for residents still without power after Hurricane Irma. You can drop off donations at the Dallas Townsend Agricultural Center at 1085 Pratt Boulevard

Gene McAvoy

Hendry County farmers and ranchers sustained significant damage to their crops and lands, after Hurricane Irma touched down on Southwest Florida on Sunday afternoon and then ravaged it's way up the coast. WGCU's Jessica Meszaros spoke with University of Florida's regional vegetable extension agent in Hendry County Gene McAvoy, who was assessing the damage Tuesday.

Photo: Jessica Meszaros, WGCU

Hurricane Irma and the massive bands of wind and rain the rocked Southwest Florida has moved north, but in the aftermath of the storm, hundreds of thousands of residents remain without power and the toll of the hurricane is beginning to come into focus as emergency responders begin assessments and repairs.

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