Jessica Meszaros

Host, Reporter

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She won five Florida Associated Press Broadcasters awards in 2017: Two were for light news features, including coverage of the state's wild pig meat industry, and of local conversations about death preparedness. Jessica was also recognized for her live afternoon newscast discussing Florida's controversial death penalty process, and a toxic red tide algae bloom poisoning Southwest Florida's marine life. Her live call-in talk show about LGBT legislation in Florida and the deadliest year for the transgender community also won. And finally, Jessica won as part of the WGCU news team covering a local shooting that left two teens dead

Her story on the state struggling to eradicate diseased and abandoned orange groves won an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for Excellence in Writing, and second place for Best Writing in PRNDI's Division B category in 2017. 

In 2016, she won two  Murrow regional awards for best newscast and best writing. She also won second place in the 2016 Sunshine State Awards for her general coverage of Florida's environmental issues. 

Jessica was previously a freelance multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

jmeszaros@wgcu.org

 

Jessica Meszaros, WGCU

WGCU reporter Jessica Meszaros has been on assignment in Guatemala for the past week. She is traveling through rural areas of the Central American country with a group of women from Southwest who are members of a community service initiative from the Unitarian Universalist Church of Fort Myers called, The GRACE Project.  That stands for the Guatemalan Rural Adult and Children’s Education Project. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Tuesday was the last day for federal financial food assistance for residents in Lee and Collier Counties who were affected by Hurricane Irma. Thousands of Southwest Floridians have already been processed.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

As of last week, 77 Collier County households have been given federal temporary emergency housing after Hurricane Irma. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU

It’s been a month and a half since Everglades City bore the brunt of Hurricane Irma’s storm surge, leaving most of the town’s homes uninhabitable, and there's still no sign of help coming from FEMA.

Courtesy of Lisa Marteeny

Lisa Marteeny survived 8-to-10 feet of storm surge during Hurricane Irma in Everglades City. But her husband of nearly 13 years Lee Marteeny did not. He died at the age of 72 from a bacterial infection days after wading in nearly chest-deep floodwaters with his wife. Lisa Marteeny, 62, describes in her own words what it was like to wait out the major storm on her neighbor Adela Butler’s back porch, which is on stilts. And she talks about losing her husband days later:


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