Jessica Meszaros

Host, Reporter

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She won five Florida Associated Press Broadcasters awards in 2017: Two were for light news features, including coverage of the state's wild pig meat industry, and of local conversations about death preparedness. Jessica was also recognized for her live afternoon newscast discussing Florida's controversial death penalty process, and a toxic red tide algae bloom poisoning Southwest Florida's marine life. Her live call-in talk show about LGBT legislation in Florida and the deadliest year for the transgender community also won. And finally, Jessica won as part of the WGCU news team covering a local shooting that left two teens dead

In 2016, she won two Edward R. Murrow Regional Awards for best newscast and best writing. She also won second place in the 2016 Sunshine State Awards for her general coverage of Florida's environmental issues. 

Jessica was previously a freelance multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

jmeszaros@wgcu.org

 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Federal environmental officials said Tuesday they will not force Florida to update its standards for potable and surface waters. This response comes eight years after environmental advocates petitioned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to prepare and publish revised regulations for the state’s waters. Activists want the feds involved because state environmental officials have not updated the state’s water quality criteria in 25 years. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

  The Florida Legislature finally included compensation in the state budget for Lee County and Broward County residents after agriculture officials removed their healthy citrus trees in the early 2000s. It was a failed attempt by the Florida Department of Agriculture to eradicate the bacterial disease citrus canker. These residents hope the governor will sign the state budget to end their years-long battle. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

This past state legislative session, Florida’s beaches got the most funding for renourishment than they have in more than a decade: $50 million. 

WGCU

 UPDATED: Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 4:25 pm 

Lee County is once again looking for the chemical arsenic on Pine Island. That’s after documents surfaced from a few years ago showing arsenic levels hundreds and sometimes thousands of times higher than the federal government allows on private and public lands.

Experts say this could’ve potentially harmed island residents and wildlife within the surrounding estuaries. Arsenic is a naturally occurring metal, but state and federal health officials say if high levels are consumed, it can make people sick and cause cancer.

Public records show state environmental officials knew about the high arsenic levels but decided to stop testing for it in 2015.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

A couple researchers created fake mangroves in Manasota Key to bring back marine life that was lost from development. Along Florida’s coasts are seawalls-- built to prevent the shoreline from eroding. But that defense sometimes means removing natural habitats. Experts are now trying to turn these solid barriers into thriving ecosystems.

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