Jessica Meszaros

Host, Reporter

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She won five Florida Associated Press Broadcasters awards in 2017: Two were for light news features, including coverage of the state's wild pig meat industry, and of local conversations about death preparedness. Jessica was also recognized for her live afternoon newscast discussing Florida's controversial death penalty process, and a toxic red tide algae bloom poisoning Southwest Florida's marine life. Her live call-in talk show about LGBT legislation in Florida and the deadliest year for the transgender community also won. And finally, Jessica won as part of the WGCU news team covering a local shooting that left two teens dead

Her story on the state struggling to eradicate diseased and abandoned orange groves won an Edward R. Murrow Regional Award for Excellence in Writing, and second place for Best Writing in PRNDI's Division B category in 2017. 

In 2016, she won two  Murrow regional awards for best newscast and best writing. She also won second place in the 2016 Sunshine State Awards for her general coverage of Florida's environmental issues. 

Jessica was previously a freelance multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

jmeszaros@wgcu.org

 

Pixabay.com / Creative Commons/skeeze

Researchers say invasive Burmese pythons are depleting so many animals in the Everglades, mosquitoes there are mainly biting a species of rat that carries a virus dangerous to humans. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Nearly a month after Hurricane Irma washed 8-to-10 feet of storm surge onto Everglades City in southern Collier County, residents with damaged, unlivable homes are still waiting on emergency temporary housing. City officials estimate about 100 homes in the area are uninhabitable due to flood damage and mold. But officials say they expect relief within a week.

Photo: Jessica Meszaros, WGCU

While most of Southwest Florida is getting back to normal nearly three weeks after Hurricane Irma, in Everglades City in southern Collier County, it’s a different story. The town saw eight to ten feet of storm surge from Hurricane Irma, some homes completely washed away, and those still standing filled by mud, mold, and destruction.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Since Hurricane Irma hit Southwest Florida last week, officials in Hendry County said they've been handing out, on average, a couple semi-trucks of food and water per day. They were also giving away ice, tarps and other necessities Tuesday at the Dallas B. Townsend Agricultural Center in LaBelle.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Hurricane Irma destroyed farms and groves all around Hendry County. An agriculture expert says 78 percent of the adult population in Hendry works in the ag industry.  Irma damages will affect everyone from growers to grocery stores.

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