Jessica Meszaros

Host, Reporter

Jessica Meszaros is a reporter and host of All Things Considered for WGCU News.

She won five Florida Associated Press Broadcasters awards in 2017: Two were for light news features, including coverage of the state's wild pig meat industry, and of local conversations about death preparedness. Jessica was also recognized for her live afternoon newscast discussing Florida's controversial death penalty process, and a toxic red tide algae bloom poisoning Southwest Florida's marine life. Her live call-in talk show about LGBT legislation in Florida and the deadliest year for the transgender community also won. And finally, Jessica won as part of the WGCU news team covering a local shooting that left two teens dead

In 2016, she won two Edward R. Murrow Regional Awards for best newscast and best writing. She also won second place in the 2016 Sunshine State Awards for her general coverage of Florida's environmental issues. 

Jessica was previously a freelance multimedia reporter for Miami’s public radio station, WLRN Radio, for more than two years.

In the summer of 2013, Jessica interned for NPR's All Things Considered  in Washington D.C. She has a background in newspaper reporting from her summer 2014 internship with the Sun-Sentinel in South Florida.  

Jessica graduated from Florida International University with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from the Honors College.

jmeszaros@wgcu.org

 

Pixabay/Public Domain

A recent national study rates the Cape Coral-Fort Myers metropolitan area the most dangerous in the country for pedestrians. And Florida was labeled the worst state, overall.

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

Florida is probably best known for its beaches. But for some residents who live far from the coast, a day at the beach is not a common event. So there’s a program in Southwest Florida to make sure children growing up inland learn the value of the state’s coastal environment. 

Matthew Smith / WGCU News

Harvard University wants to study impacts of sea level rise in Southwest Florida-- Collier County, in particular. This was proposed during a climate change meeting at Florida Gulf Coast University on Monday. 

Jessica Meszaros / WGCU News

There’s a neighborhood in Southwest Florida that’s changing the way people think about affordable housing. The Economic Policy Institute rated the Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island metro area worst in the state for income inequality this year. But now, in the farmworker community of Immokalee, low-income residents have a chance to live in three-bedroom/two-bath houses. 

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