Julie Glenn

Julie Glenn is the host of Gulf Coast Live. She has been working in southwest Florida as a freelance writer since 2007, most recently as a regular columnist for the Naples Daily News. She began her broadcasting career in 1993 as a reporter/anchor/producer for a local CBS affiliate in Quincy, Illinois. After also working for the NBC affiliate, she decided to move to Parma, Italy where she earned her Master’s degree in communication from the University of Gastronomic Sciences. Her undergraduate degree in Mass Communication is from the University of Missouri at Kansas City.

Fluent in Italian, Julie has also worked with Italian wine companies creating and translating web content and marketing materials. Her work has been featured in international, national, and local magazines. She has served as president of the local chapter of Slow Food where she remains on the board. Her interests include cooking, traveling, and spending time with her family.

Photo: Wikimedia Creative Commons

With three reported alligator bites in as many days in Southwest Florida, and state wildlife officials reporting a record pace of 16 such bites so far in 2017, we turn to the people who work with them every day for some tips on alligator behavior and how to avoid a bite.

Photo: Miami-Dade Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation

A man arrested in Miami-Dade county in March was cleared for release but held an extra day at the request of federal immigration officials, an act he alleges in a lawsuit violated his fourth amendment rights. Garland Creedle is now suing the county with the help of the American Civil Liberties Union.

Photo: Wikimedia Creative Commons

The British newspaper “The Guardian” last month revealed a piece of property in the middle of Florida that happened to be owned by none other the President Donald Trump. He bought it in 2005 for one dollar from a woman who’d bought it a month prior for more than $3,000.

Photo: David Albers, Naples Daily News

On Friday, the man accused of killing his wife and five young children in Collier County in 2009 will be in a court trying to prove he can represent himself at his murder trial. It's what Mesac Damas has been asking for since his arrest shortly after the murders, when police tracked him down in Haiti.

Photo: Renata Sago, WMFE

Florida sends more juveniles to adult court than any other state. Teens tried and convicted in Florida courts face longer sentences than adults found guilty of the same crime. At the same time, a juvenile tried as adult in Florida is less likely to face jail time than their peers tried in juvenile court. Those are just some of the findings of a new FSU study looking at how Florida treats juveniles transferred to its adult courts.

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