Luis Hernandez

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

Students in South Florida could soon have an app to help them with their mental health. Teacher Samantha Pratt came up with the idea as a way for students to find help dealing with personal or school stressors. The app, called Klickengage, would also let teachers know the mental states of their students before the school day gets underway.

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie is facing questions about honesty and transparency – so much so that he opened a community forum Monday by stating that he was not a liar.

Today on Sundial: Salvadorans were the most recent refugee group to lose Temporary Protected Status (TPS). It's now likely that Hondurans will also lose theirs. What's the latest update on groups like these and Nicaraguans and Haitians? What are people doing to stay in the U.S. or find another country that may take them in? We talk with Ana Quiros of Catholic Legal Services about TPS and about the recent raids by immigration services.

Democratic state Sen. Annette Taddeo was one of the first to call for the resignation of Sen. Jack Latvala. We spoke to her about the upcoming legislative session and the air of discomfort around the capital over numerous claims of sexual harassment. She also told us she was once the victim of sexual harassment when she was younger. 

South Florida lost a lot of trees during Hurricane Irma. While Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties avoided a direct hit, the storm managed to topple  palm and other canopy trees, littering the streets with tree trunks, branches and palm fronds.

One month later, the debris from the trees and shrubbery remains on the curb or street waiting to be picked up. 

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