Luis Hernandez

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

South Florida lost a lot of trees during Hurricane Irma. While Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties avoided a direct hit, the storm managed to topple  palm and other canopy trees, littering the streets with tree trunks, branches and palm fronds.

One month later, the debris from the trees and shrubbery remains on the curb or street waiting to be picked up. 

Today on Sundial: President Donald Trump is going after the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) by ending the subsidies for low-income participants. Trump critics say this will harm the working poor. There are healthcare experts, though, who say this could actually help Florida consumers. The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang will explain what happens next.

Three South Florida high school students have come up with an invention that could protect people from becoming rape victims. What's that invention? They call it the Smart Straw.

Earlier this month a swimmer was attacked by a shark at Haulover Beach in Miami-Dade County. That person suffered no life-threatening injuries, but the attack was shocking because it was so rare. In the last 135 years, there have only been 15 total attacks in Miami-Dade.

There has been a lot of attention on the issue of sexual assault on college campuses in recent years. There was an alleged case of rape on the University of Miami two years ago that ended with the firing of a professor and a lawsuit from an accused student.

Pages