John Davis

Host, Reporter

John Davis has been a full-time Reporter/Producer for WGCU since 2009. He is the local host for NPR’s Morning Edition and producer and host for WGCU’s radio talk program Gulf Coast Live! John came to WGCU as an intern in 2007, and is now reporting on a broad spectrum of topics of interest to Southwest Florida.  Prior to joining WGCU, he worked at WDUQ-FM in Pittsburgh, PA covering local government and general assignments.John studied journalism at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, before earning a Bachelor of Arts degree in Communication from Florida Gulf Coast University. His work has garnered awards from the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania, the Radio Television Digital News Association, and a first place award and “Best in Show” from the Florida Associated Press for his investigative work in 2011.

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Ways to Connect

Employment can be an important step in recovering from mental illness in terms of regaining dignity and providing focus and a sense of purpose to people’s lives.  However, a 2014 report from the National Alliance on Mental Illness finds that about 80 percent of U.S. residents receiving public mental health services are unemployed.  In Florida that unemployment rate stands at 84.7 percent.  HOPE Clubhouse of Southwest Florida is combating that problem through its efforts to provide a supportive environment for adults living with mental illness and by providing opportunities for meaningful work.  

Joe Berg, Way Down Video Production

Mote Marine Laboratory and The Nature Conservancy recently announced a new joint venture aimed at the conservation and restoration of coral reefs in Florida and the Caribbean.  With stressors ranging from rising ocean temperatures, ocean acidification, overfishing, coastal development and waste water, coral cover in the Caribbean and Florida has decreased by 50 to 80 percent in just the last three decades. 

Grieving the loss of a parent at any age can be a difficult process and for those who lose a parent during childhood the loss can be particularly profound. A 2014 study by researchers with the National Institute of Health and Welfare Finland, the Karolinksa Institute in Sweden and Aarhus University in Denmark finds that people who experience the death of a parent in childhood are more likely to die prematurely themselves.  The study, tracking more than seven million people for 42 years finds that those who lost a parent before they turned 18 were 50% more likely to die during the course of that study.

U.S. Navy

Hurricane Matthew struck Haiti last Tuesday as a powerful category four hurricane with winds up to 145 mph and leaving 1.4 million people there in need of humanitarian assistance.  The official death toll from the country’s central civil protection agency stands at 336, but according to Reuters, reported deaths by local officials indicate more than 1,000 people lost their lives in the storm.

Lee Memorial Health System

Lee Memorial Health System celebrates 100 years of serving the community’s medical needs this week.  The first Lee Memorial Hospital opened Oct. 3, 1916 in a 15-bed wood-framed building.  Since that time, it’s grown and expanded into a health system with an inpatient capacity of 1,419 beds employing more than 12,000 people.  We’ll explore LMHS’s rich history in Lee County through the Jim Crow era, the roaring 1920s, the Great Depression, two world wars and beyond.  We’ll also find out about the health system’s new look including the new name, “Lee Health” as the health system begins a new century of care.