Julie Glenn

News Director, Gulf Coast Live Host

Julie Glenn is the Interim News Director and the host of Gulf Coast Live. She joined the WGCU team in November of 2016 to expand the Gulf Coast Live call-in radio show from once a week to five days a week.  Since then, the show has been recognized in state and regional competitions and has featured artists, political leaders, historians, environmental experts, doctors, local reporters, and natioanl and international scholars. After leading the station's award-winning coverage of Hurricane Irma in September of 2017, Julie was named Interim News Director. In January of 2018, she launched WGCU's first podcast: Grape Minds.

Before joining WGCU, Julie worked in southwest Florida as a freelance food and wine writer, and as a regular wine columnist for the Naples Daily News. She began her broadcasting career in 1993 as a reporter/anchor/producer for a local CBS affiliate in Quincy, Illinois. After also working for the NBC affiliate, she decided to move to Parma, Italy where she earned her Master’s degree in communication from the University of Gastronomic Sciences. Her undergraduate degree in Mass Communication is from the University of Missouri at Kansas City.

Fluent in Italian, Julie has also worked with Italian wine companies creating and translating web content and marketing materials. Her work has been featured in international, national, and local magazines. Her interests include cooking, traveling, and spending time with her family.

The Sagemont School / Instagram


They’re not yet old enough to vote, but they want to hold the state accountable for how its treated environmental issues.

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Southwest Florida is a boaters’ paradise, with miles of canals leading to rivers and the gulf. People often move here almost entirely because of our access to the water. But, Florida leads the nation overall when it comes to boating accidents and fatalities, and southwest Florida is certainly no exception. This week is the 60th annual National Safe Boating Week. It’s when officials try to spread the word about what boaters should be doing, and paying attention to, while out on the water. We’re joined by Brian Rehwinkel from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Boating and Waterways Section, he’s one of those officials trying to get the word out about boating safety. And we’re joined by Heather Preston, she’s an astrophysicist and Planetarium Director at the Calusa Nature Center and Planetarium in Fort Myers. She'll be leading a Captain's Night Presentation on Friday, May 25 the subject of Hawaiian Wayfinding: that’s how to use things like stars, winds, waves, currents, salinity, etc. to navigate while out on the water.

Annie Splatt / Unsplash


Now that steamy summer is upon us, the kids are out of school and business has slowed down for most, people are looking to get out of dodge.

 

Summer travel season unofficially kicks off this weekend with Memorial Day road trips. According to AAA, more than 41.5 million Americans will travel this holiday weekend, nearly five percent more than last year.

 

Oregon State University

By now you’ve probably heard of the giant patch of plastics floating in the Pacific Ocean, and things like micro-beads from cosmetics turning up in waterways, and the animals that inhabit them - you may even have seen reports about a plastic bag turning up in the deepest part of the ocean, the Mariana Trench. While its durability is one of things that makes plastic so useful, it’s also what’s turning out to make it so dangerous - it can take centuries for some plastic materials to degrade, and more and more of it is winding up in the environment. We’re localizing the issue with new data collected by the Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program. It’s been using citizen scientists to collect some baseline information on where micro-plastics can be found in waters across southwest Florida. We’re joined by its executive director, Jennifer Hecker.

Etude Winemaker talks Pinot, Tall Bottles, and sell-out Rosé. The charming and effervescent winemaker behind Carneros powerhouse Etude, Jon Priest, stopped by the studio for this week’s Grape Minds. We talk about the long, tall Pinot Gris bottle (the Galliano of the wine shelf), the beguiling Pinot Noir grape, and a Santa Barbara County foray into by-the-glass tier wines. 

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