Quincy J Walters


Quincy Walters is a reporter and backup host for WGCU.

He started in public radio as an intern at WUSF, the NPR member station for the Tampa Bay area. A year later, he was a production intern for NPR’s Weekend All Things Considered in Washington, D.C. After Quincy’s internship, he returned to WUSF as a reporter.

His stories have aired on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered and Morning Edition.

Quincy earned a degree in English with a concentration in creative writing from the University of South Florida.

Lee County Solid Waste

When seasonal residents of Southwest Florida start getting ready to head back up north, they may leave behind non-perishable food items, which could spoil and have to be thrown away.

That’s why Lee County has come up with an initiative to not let that food go to waste.

Quincy J Walters / WGCU News

All across the country, students walked out of their schools to advocate for gun control and to commemorate the 17 lives lost in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting one month ago today/Wednesday.  At a high school in Venice, Fla.,  students had support from school administrators and the Sarasota County school district.

Quincy Walters

Some Southwest Florida students walked out of their classes at 10:00 this morning on the one month anniversary of the day a 19-year-old walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and opened fire with his legally-obtained AR-15 rifle, killing 17 people.

Before school this morning, students at South Fort Myers High School assembled on the athletics field in the shape of a heart for a vigil. But, for the actual walkout there was some confusion in Lee County as to whether students would be able to participate. In Sarasota County the district and school principals announced they would permit students to participate without fear of repercussions.

WGCU’s Rachel Iacavone was at Cypress Lake High School in Lee County, and Quincy Walters was at Venice High School in Sarasota County, and they both joined us in studio to give us a sense of how it went.

Quincy J Walters / WGCU News

Utility company Florida Power & Light unveiled a new component to their solar field in Punta Gorda  for members of the media Friday . FPL is saying it’s one of the biggest of its kind in the country. 

Quincy J Walters / WGCU News

In 1945 General Dwight D. Eisenhower, later to become President Eisenhower, wanted the world to see what he called the “indescribable horror” of concentration camps after they were liberated. That’s why he suggested the United States take videos and photographs of the death and devastation. Dwight Eisenhower’s grandson, David Eisenhower, was at the Holocaust Museum of Southwest Florida Monday to talk about the legacy of what his grandfather did.