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Red Tide Report

Red Tide Status Map 2-24-21.png
Screenshot of SWFL red tide map from FWC 3-5-21

We'll update this page regularly with the latest red tide information for Southwest Florida.

Red Tide Health Alert for March 5, 2021

The Florida Department of Health in Lee County (DOH-Lee) is alerting the public to red tide-related health alert for Fort Myers Beach (Beach Access 13):

Some people may have mild and short-lived respiratory symptoms such as eye, nose and throat irritation similar to cold symptoms. Some individuals with breathing problems such as asthma might experience more severe symptoms. Usually symptoms go away when a person leaves the area or goes indoors. Health officials recommend that people experiencing these symptoms stay away from beach areas or go into an air-conditioned space. If symptoms do not subside, please contact your health care provider for evaluation.

Red Tide Update for March 5, 2021

According to FWC:

Fish kills suspected to be related to red tide were reported over the past week in Charlotte County. For more details, please visit: https://myfwc.com/research/saltwater/health/fish-kills-hotline/.

FWC also notes that red tide-related respiratory irritation was reported over the past week in Charlotte, Collier, Lee, and Sarasota counties.

According to FWC:

The red tide organism, Karenia brevis, persists in Southwest Florida. Over the past week, K. brevis was detected in 53 samples at background to medium concentrations.

To learn more about red tide in Florida, click here.

Red Tide Update for March 3, 2021

FWC reports a fish kill in Charlotte County, respiratory irritation in Lee and Collier Counties, and that red tide was found in 48 samples in the past week:

In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at very low to low concentrations in Sarasota County (in eight samples), very low to low concentrations in Charlotte County (in five samples), background to medium concentrations in and offshore of Lee County (in 25 samples), background to low concentrations in and offshore of Collier County (in nine samples), and background concentrations offshore of Monroe County (in one sample). Samples from Pinellas, Hillsborough, and Manatee counties did not contain red tide.

For information on fish kills visit http://myfwc.com/fishkill.

For current conditions,visit https://visitbeaches.org.

Red Tide Alert for March 2, 2021

The Florida Department of Health in Lee County (DOH-Lee) is alerting the public to red tide blooms near Tarpon Bay Road Beach Access.

The DOH-Lee says:

Some people may have mild and short-lived respiratory symptoms such as eye, nose and throat irritation similar to cold symptoms. Some individuals with breathing problems such as asthma might experience more severe symptoms. Usually symptoms go away when a person leaves the area or goes indoors. Health officials recommend that people experiencing these symptoms stay away from beach areas or go into an air-conditioned space. If symptoms do not subside, please contact your health care provider for evaluation.

The Department recommends that you:

  • Do not swim around dead fish at this location.
  • If you have chronic respiratory problems, be careful and consider staying away from this location as red tide can affect your breathing.
  • Do not harvest or eat molluscan shellfish and distressed or dead fish from this location. If fish are healthy, rinse fillets with tap or bottled water and throw out the guts.
  • Keep pets and livestock away from water, sea foam and dead sea life.
  • Residents living in beach areas are advised to close windows and run the air conditioner (making sure that the A/C filter is maintained according to manufacturer's specifications).
  • If outdoors, residents may choose to wear paper filter masks, especially if onshore winds are blowing.

Florida Poison Control Centers have a toll-free 24/7 Hotline for reporting of illnesses, including health effects from exposure to red tide at 1-800-222-1222.

Red Tide Alert for February 26, 2021

Updated March 1: An alert for South Seas Plantation Beach was issued as well.

There is a Health Alert for Bonita Springs Beach Park, from the Florida Department of Health in Lee County (DOH-Lee) due to a red tide bloom.

The DOH-Lee says:

Some people may have mild and short-lived respiratory symptoms such as eye, nose and throat irritation similar to cold symptoms. Some individuals with breathing problems such as asthma might experience more severe symptoms. Usually symptoms go away when a person leaves the area or goes indoors. Health officials recommend that people experiencing these symptoms stay away from beach areas or go into an air-conditioned space. If symptoms do not subside, please contact your health care provider for evaluation.

The Department recommends that you:

  • Do not swim around dead fish at this location.
  • If you have chronic respiratory problems, be careful and consider staying away from this location as red tide can affect your breathing.
  • Do not harvest or eat molluscan shellfish and distressed or dead fish from this location. If fish are healthy, rinse fillets with tap or bottled water and throw out the guts.
  • Keep pets and livestock away from water, sea foam and dead sea life.
  • Residents living in beach areas are advised to close windows and run the air conditioner (making sure that the A/C filter is maintained according to manufacturer's specifications).
  • If outdoors, residents may choose to wear paper filter masks, especially if onshore winds are blowing.

Florida Poison Control Centers have a toll-free 24/7 Hotline for reporting of illnesses, including health effects from exposure to red tide at 1-800-222-1222.

Red Tide Update for February 24, 2021

Fish kills and red tide-related respiratory irritation were reported in the last week in Lee County. Fish kills were also reported in Collier County.

According to FWC:

In Southwest Florida over the past week, K. brevis was observed at background concentrations in Sarasota County (in one sample), very low concentrations in Charlotte County (in one sample), background to medium concentrations in Lee County (in 16 samples), and background to very low concentrations in Collier County (in three samples). Samples from Pinellas and Manatee counties did not contain red tide.

To report a Fish Kill call the Fish Kill Hotline: 800-636-0511

Red Tide Update February 19, 2021, 1pm

The Florida Department of Health in Lee County (DOH-Lee) is notifying the public of a red tide bloom near Lynn Hall Park.

Some people may experience respiratory problems as a result.

The Department recommends that you:

  • Do not swim around dead fish at this location.
  • If you have chronic respiratory problems, be careful and consider staying away from this location as red tide can affect your breathing.
  • Do not harvest or eat molluscan shellfish and distressed or dead fish from this location. If fish are healthy, rinse fillets with tap or bottled water and throw out the guts.
  • Keep pets and livestock away from water, sea foam and dead sea life.
  • Residents living in beach areas are advised to close windows and run the air conditioner (making sure that the A/C filter is maintained according to manufacturer's specifications).
  • If outdoors, residents may choose to wear paper filter masks, especially if onshore winds are blowing.

Florida Poison Control Centers have a toll-free 24/7 Hotline for reporting of illnesses, including health effects from exposure to red tide at 1-800-222-1222.

Red Tide Mid-Week Update for February 17, 2021

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, red tide, a.k.a. K. brevis, "was observed at very low concentrations in Sarasota County (in one sample), background to very low concentrations in Charlotte County (in four samples), background to medium concentrations in Lee County (in 17 samples), and very low to medium concentrations in and offshore of Collier County (in 11 samples)."

Fish kills related to the red tide were reported in both Lee and Collier counties. Respiratory conditions related to red tide were also reported in Lee county.

Despite declining amounts of the red tide, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation reports an increase in birds impacted by the toxic algae, with 60 royal terns being admitted to the CROW clinic for K. brevis-related health problems since February 1st. Thirty-eight have died.

Red Tide Mid-Week Update for February 11, 2021

According to the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, "Respiratory irritation was reported over the past week in Southwest Florida in Lee and Collier counties."

The organism responsible for toxic red tide blooms, Karenia brevis, is currently in Southwest Florida, earlier than usual. The FWC reports it found "medium" concentrations of Karenia brevis in 18 water samples taken both in and offshore of Lee County, and in "background to low" concentrations in 11 water samples taken in and offshore of Collier County.

FWC has not reported any recent fish kills related to the red tide.

To learn more and see the latest official information, visit https://myfwc.com/research/redtide/?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term=campaign