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Citizen Scientists Track SWFL Frog Populations by Walking and Listening

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Jim Conrad / Public domain
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Squirrel Tree Frog

The Southwest Florida Amphibian Monitoring Network, or Frog Watch, was established in the year 2000 in order to collect long-term data on frog communities of the region. Volunteers, which include researchers, students, and members of the public walk specific routes at night during the summer listening for the sounds of frog calls, and collecting that data.

The goal is to determine potential factors that might influence long-term changes in frog populations and communities, including natural variations, disappearing and altered habitats, and the impacts of invasive species.

 

We’re joined by the Florida Gulf Coast University professor who’s mostly led this effort, and a recent FGCU graduate. They will be talking about the program next Wednesday, March 18, at the Sanibel Community House on Sanibel Island as part of the university’s “Research Roadshow.”

 

Dr. Win Everham is a Professor in the Department of Ecology & Environmental Studies at Florida Gulf Coast University and a founding faculty member. And Taylor Hancock recently graduated from FGCU with a bachelor’s and master’s degrees in environmental science.